Thursday, November 10, 2011

Remembrance Day, 11/11/11

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Propaganda Posters
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Veteran's Day Requires a Rethink
by Henry Makow Ph,D.
November 10, 2011
If central bankers start all the wars, are veterans heroes, or mercenaries and dupes?
When the United States and England loaned Mexico money in 1903 using its customs revenue as collateral, Illuminati banker Jacob Schiff cabled his English counterpart, Ernest Cassel:
"If they don't pay, who will collect the customs?"
Cassel replied:
"Your marines and ours." (The Life of Otto Kahn, p. 22)
Marine General Smedley Butler (1881-1940) confirmed that he was "a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers."
In War is a Racket (1935) he wrote: "I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested."
Flash forward to 2011 when NATO fomented and led a "revolution" in Libya, one of only four countries that didn't have a Rothschild central bank. Now Libya does.
They don't call it imperialism anymore. They call it "Our mission in Libya." Soldiers aren't mercenaries; they are "missionaries."
Central Bankers are Behind All Wars
All wars are organized by the Illuminati bankers to collect or incur debt, plunder or profit, and advance their program for "world government" tyranny. They appeal to our patriotism to sucker us in. We are told we are fighting to "preserve freedom" when the opposite is actually the case.
So how should we regard veterans? Certainly a few are heroes, but usually in a bogus cause.
I think we have to regard them as dupes and mercenaries of the bankers. We have all been duped for a very long time. That gives Veteran's Day a tinge of cynicism and pathos.
On Nov. 11, we are mostly commemorating World War Two. While we were losing fathers and sons, Allied and Nazi central bankers were huddled in Basel at the Bank of International Settlements mainly financing the Nazis.
The BIS handed over to the Nazis the national treasure of Czechoslovakia, Holland and Belgium to ensure the war could go on. This gold, worth $378 million at the time, was the basis of loans to the Nazis and was never returned.
The BIS accepted and stored Nazis plunder -- art, diamonds and precious metals including dental gold and wedding rings from concentration camp inmates.
The US Federal Reserve, the Banks of England, France, Italy, Japan and the Reichsbank were all members of the BIS. The Nazi Reichsbank had most seats but the BIS President was a Rockefeller factotum Thomas H. McKittrick (1889-1970). (Significantly he has no Wikipedia entry.)
"Changing the World" Means having a World War
(Left: Thomas McKittrick)
Questioned by a US Treasury Dept official in March 1945, McKittrick said that the war had been a charade all along, with Germany taking the fall.
Asked why the Nazis had worked with the BIS, he replied, "In the complicated German financial setup, certain men who have their central bankers' point of view are in very strategic positions and can influence the conduct of the German government..."
Then he spelled it out. The war's purpose was to reposition Germany for the banker New World Order:
"McKittrick went on to say that there was a little group of financiers who had felt from the beginning that Germany would lose the war; that after defeat they might emerge to shape Germany's destiny. That they would "maintain their contacts and trust with other important banking elements so that they would be in a stronger position in the postwar world to negotiate loans for the reconstruction of Germany."
This quotation is from Charles Higham's mind blowing book, Trading With the Enemy, 1983, p. 37.
A Who's Who of corporations controlled by these bankers, had factories in occupied Europe. They underpinned the Nazi war effort and profited handsomely.
Ford, General Motors, Standard Oil and ITT provided the Nazis with essential trucks, airplane engines, materiel and technology, often giving the Nazis preference during shortages. In a telling example, the Allies bombed a ball bearing plant in Germany only to have the stock replaced by a factory in Pennsylvania (via Sweden.)
Higham refers to these bankers as "the fraternity." They are the Illuminati.
We could also show how an earlier set of bankers masterminded World War One and how they kept it going. But I think you get the picture. All wars are really waged by the Luciferian central bankers against humanity, i.e "the goyim."
In 1916, almost 1.2 million British, French and German soldiers died or were maimed in the Battle of the Somme alone. They were the cream of their generation. By participating in any war, we are accomplices in our own destruction.
The military is catching on too. A recent poll found that only 34 percent of U.S. veterans of the post-9/11 military believed that the Iraq and Afghanistan wars were worth fighting. US soldiers now generally say they are fighting "for their buddies" not for their country.
Conclusion
We cannot honor veterans without recognizing that, like us, they have been duped. Otherwise, we perpetuate the sinister power which holds us prisoner.
Ultimately, the New World Order is about replacing the rule of God with the rule of Lucifer. That's why "God" has become a dirty word. War is the principal means by which Lucifer's disciples, the Cabalist (satanist) central bankers, "change the world."
They have erected a police state behind the facade of freedom. We don't know this because our leaders in government, education and media are wittingly or unwitting participants. Treason to God and country is a prerequisite for success in many fields.
If honoring veterans means perpetuating a suicidal cycle of endless war, we must stop. Better to honor the dead by abolishing wars. We can do this by nationalizing private central banks, and making the bankers answer for their crimes.
Related -- Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler by Antony Suttton
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Fahrenheit 11/11/11
By David Swanson
URL of this article: www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=27533
Global Research, November 8, 2011
warisacrime.org
Believe it or not, November 11th was not made a holiday in order to celebrate war, support troops, or cheer the 11th year of occupying Afghanistan. This day was made a holiday in order to celebrate an armistice that ended what was up until that point, in 1918, one of the worst things our species had thus far done to itself, namely World War I.
World War I, then known simply as the world war or the great war, had been marketed as a war to end war. Celebrating its end was also understood as celebrating the end of all wars. A ten-year campaign was launched in 1918 that in 1928 created the Kellogg-Briand Pact, legally banning all wars. That treaty is still on the books, which is why war making is a criminal act and how Nazis came to be prosecuted for it.
"[O]n November 11, 1918, there ended the most unnecessary, the most financially exhausting, and the most terribly fatal of all the wars that the world has ever known. Twenty millions of men and women, in that war, were killed outright, or died later from wounds. The Spanish influenza, admittedly caused by the War and nothing else, killed, in various lands, one hundred million persons more." -- Thomas Hall Shastid, 1927.
According to U.S. Socialist Victor Berger, all the United States had gained from participation in World War I was the flu and prohibition. It was not an uncommon view. Millions of Americans who had supported World War I came, during the years following its completion on November 11, 1918, to reject the idea that anything could ever be gained through warfare.
Sherwood Eddy, who coauthored "The Abolition of War" in 1924, wrote that he had been an early and enthusiastic supporter of U.S. entry into World War I and had abhorred pacifism. He had viewed the war as a religious crusade and had been reassured by the fact that the United States entered the war on a Good Friday. At the war front, as the battles raged, Eddy writes, "we told the soldiers that if they would win we would give them a new world."
Eddy seems, in a typical manner, to have come to believe his own propaganda and to have resolved to make good on the promise. "But I can remember," he writes, "that even during the war I began to be troubled by grave doubts and misgivings of conscience." It took him 10 years to arrive at the position of complete Outlawry, that is to say, of wanting to legally outlaw all war. By 1924 Eddy believed that the campaign for Outlawry amounted, for him, to a noble and glorious cause worthy of sacrifice, or what U.S. philosopher William James had called "the moral equivalent of war." Eddy now argued that war was "unchristian." Many came to share that view who a decade earlier had believed Christianity required war. A major factor in this shift was direct experience with the hell of modern warfare, an experience captured for us by the British poet Wilfred Owen in these famous lines:
If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.
The propaganda machinery invented by President Woodrow Wilson and his Committee on Public Information had drawn Americans into the war with exaggerated and fictional tales of German atrocities in Belgium, posters depicting Jesus Christ in khaki sighting down a gun barrel, and promises of selfless devotion to making the world safe for democracy. The extent of the casualties was hidden from the public as much as possible during the course of the war, but by the time it was over many had learned something of war's reality. And many had come to resent the manipulation of noble emotions that had pulled an independent nation into overseas barbarity.
However, the propaganda that motivated the fighting was not immediately erased from people's minds. A war to end wars and make the world safe for democracy cannot end without some lingering demand for peace and justice, or at least for something more valuable than the flu and prohibition. Even those rejecting the idea that the war could in any way help advance the cause of peace aligned with all those wanting to avoid all future wars -- a group that probably encompassed most of the U.S. population.
As Wilson had talked up peace as the official reason for going to war, countless souls had taken him extremely seriously. "It is no exaggeration to say that where there had been relatively few peace schemes before the World War," writes Robert Ferrell, "there now were hundreds and even thousands" in Europe and the United States. The decade following the war was a decade of searching for peace: "Peace echoed through so many sermons, speeches, and state papers that it drove itself into the consciousness of everyone. Never in world history was peace so great a desideratum, so much talked about, looked toward, and planned for, as in the decade after the 1918 Armistice."
Let us try to revive some memory of that foreign world on the occasion of the latest "veterans day" this Friday in this brave new era of searching for more war.
David Swanson is the author of "When the World Outlawed War" from which this is adapted.
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Also See:
Remembrance Day, 11 November 2010
11 November 2010
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2010/11/remembrance-day.html
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