Thursday, June 13, 2013

Whistleblower Edward Snowden - Is He For Real?

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Obama WANTS you to know Big Government is Watching You
Deliberate Marxist misery wants you to know that Big Government is watching you
By Judi McLeod
It’s getting to the point where civilians need a ‘Truth Meter’ before venturing out the door each morning; a Truth Meter for a public at large steadily bombarded with lies, propaganda and more lies each waking day.
In a perfect world the Truth Meter would have a capacity something like the smart meter, now telling well-paid municipal bureaucrats who are no better than spies, who is in the house, how much electricity they are using, whether they are sleeping or active, watching the boob tube or tuned into Rush on the radio.
But lost in all the white noise average citizens are up against it in discerning who are the liars; who are the ‘bad guys’ or ‘good guys’ in the challenging playing field called life.
The talking heads of television trot out the same panels, who continue to state the obvious and to tediously tell folk what they already know. Radio talk show hosts are more than ever screaming out their frustrations at callers who are just trying to come in out of the storm and have someone listen momentarily to their worries and woes.
New technology would now allow cable companies to peer directly into television watchers’ homes and monitor viewing habits and reactions to product advertisements, warns the Washington Times.
“Mass. Democratic Rep. Michael Capuano has introduced a bill, the We Are Watching You Act, to prohibit the technology on boxes and collection of information absent consumer permission. The bill would also require companies that do use the data to show “we are watching you” messages on the screen and to explain just what kinds of information is being captured for and what reasons, AdWeek reported.” (Washington Times, June 18, 2013)
As if flashing messages warning “we are watching you” is going to help.
Watch it go down without a peep from cable television networks.
And we’re worried about the National Security Agency (NSA) and both sides fighting for and against it, dragging each other into the mud?
In a world where nothing is ever set right, (Benghazi, IRS, DHS and now NSA dragged out onto the front lines) along comes ‘super spy’ and ‘hero’ Edward Snowden.
To be clear NOTHING is ever done to stop the ongoing rape and pillage of individual rights in Obama’s Amerika.
Things were bound to get worse when almost the entire, so-called ‘New Media’ joined the jabbering MSM to paint a self-described ‘patriot’, who just wanted the best for the people of his own country, as a martyr/hero.
Snowden is no hero unless we have changed the definition of hero. Heroes are those who put their lives and limbs at risk defending the folk back home; those who run into burning buildings rather than fleeing them; those with real skin in the game.
Patriots and heroes are those who defend their own principles, putting them over their own personal safety, in striving to do some good for others.
It is my belief that Snowden and his interviewer/Svengali Glenn Greenwald knew ahead of time that they would easily slip the noose of blame before they outed classified documents from the NSA.
If the IRS got away with discriminating against Tea party groups; the DHS gets away with identifying decent, law-abiding Americans, including returning war vets, as domestic terrorists, why wouldn’t Snowden be able to thumb his nose at the country he cut and ran from and grab headlines as a credible replacement for Double O Seven to boot?
If Nidal Malik Hasan, who slaughtered 13 innocents at Fort Hood has yet to be brought to justice four years later; if Obama can seriously contemplate the release of 166 dozen suspected terrorists from Guantanamo Bay, and on and on, why would Snowden, lionized by both the MSM and the New Media, sincerely worry about being extradited from China back to the U.S., or pay a price of any kind for releasing documents from his unsuspecting employer?
Both the Guardian and the Washington Post are left-wing members of the mainstream media. When is the last time you saw the MSM do anything noble for the ‘little guy’ in the reading public?
“We are Watching You” is the new mantra of the day. It is what the government wants you to think.
Where is President Barack Obama when the privacy of private citizens is being raped and plundered? Playing the rich playboy in Ireland, with his wife searching for their “Irish roots” on their way to a $100-million South African trip that bests the Queen of England for most money spent on any single trip.
Deliberate Marxist misery wants you to know that Big Government is watching you.
Does it look to anyone else like Edward Snowden is the agent sent out to deliver Obama’s message?
Judi McLeod is an award-winning journalist with 30 years’ experience in the print media. A former Toronto Sun columnist, she also worked for the Kingston Whig Standard. Her work has appeared on Rush Limbaugh, Newsmax.com, Drudge Report, Foxnews.com, and Glenn Beck.Judi can be emailed at: judi@canadafreepress.com
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Did someone help Ed Snowden punch a hole in the NSA?
by: Jon Rappoport
Thursday, June 13, 2013
(NaturalNews) Ed Snowden, NSA leaker. Honest man. Doing what was right. Bravo.
That still doesn't preclude the possibility that, unknown to him, he was managed by people to put him the right place to expose NSA secrets.
Snowden's exposure of NSA was a righteous act, because that agency is a RICO criminal. But that doesn't mean we have the whole story.
How many people work in classified jobs for the NSA? And here is one man, Snowden, who is working for Booz Allen, an outside contractor, but is assigned to NSA, and he can get access to, and copy, documents that expose the spying collaboration between NSA and the biggest tech companies in the world---and he can get away with it.
If so, then NSA is a sieve leaking out of all holes. Because that means a whole lot of other, higher NSA employees can likewise steal these documents. Many, many other people can copy them and take them. Poof.
If the NSA is not a sieve, it's quite correct to suspect Snowden, a relatively low-level man, was guided and helped.
Does that diminish what Snowden accomplished? No. But it casts it in a different light.
Or you can believe a scenario like this:
"Mr. Snowden, I'm closing up now for the day. Do you need anything before I go?"
"No thanks, Sarah, I'll be staying late tonight."
NSA isn't a little community bank or a liquor store. We aren't talking about an employee with a printer and a file folder to hold top-secret pieces of paper he carries in a briefcase out of the office on his way home.If there are people who arranged Snowden's access to NSA secrets, without him knowing it, they'll be obscured by the maze of partisan political squabbling and Congressional idiots holding hearings.
Between these morons and the press, the public will be treated, night and day, to the following: Can Snowden be extradited back here? Is he a terrorist? Should those giant tech companies have agreed to supply the government with information on private citizens? If so, how much information? Etc., etc. Diversions. False trails.
To understand who might have been behind Snowden, we first need to understand the real reach of the Surveillance State.
The Surveillance State has created an apparatus whose implications are staggering. It's a different world now. And sometimes it takes a writer of fiction to flesh out the larger landscape.
Brad Thor's novel, Black List, posits the existence of a monster corporation, ATS, that stands along side the NSA in collecting information on every move we make. ATS' intelligence-gathering capability is unmatched anywhere in the world.
At his site,
www.BradThor.com, the author lists some of the open-source material he discovered that formed the basis for Black List. The material, as well as the novel, is worth reading.
On pages 117-118 of Black List, Thor makes a stunning inference that, on reflection, is as obvious as the fingers on your hand:
"For years ATS [substitute NSA] had been using its technological superiority to conduct massive insider trading. Since the early 1980s, the company had spied on anyone and everyone in the financial world. They listened in on phone calls, intercepted faxes, and evolved right along with the technology, hacking internal computer networks and e-mail accounts. They created mountains of 'black dollars' for themselves, which they washed through various programs they were running under secret contract, far from the prying eyes of financial regulators.
"Those black dollars were invested into hard assets around the world, as well as in the stock market, through sham, offshore corporations. They also funneled the money into reams of promising R&D projects, which eventually would be turned around and sold to the Pentagon or the
CIA.
"In short, ATS had created its own license to print money and had assured itself a place beyond examination or reproach."
In real life, whether the prime criminal source is one monster corporation or the NSA itself, the outcome would be the same.
Total surveillance has unlimited payoffs when it targets financial markets and the people who have intimate knowledge of them.
"Total security awareness" programs of surveillance are ideal spying ops in the financial arena, designed to grab millions of bits of inside information, and then utilize them to make investments and suck up billions (trillions?) of dollars.
It gives new meaning to "the rich get richer."
Taking the overall scheme to another level, consider this: those same heavy hitters (NSA) who have unfettered access to financial information can also choose, at opportune moments, to expose certain scandals and crimes.
In this way, they can, at their whim, cripple governments, banks, and corporations. They can cripple investment houses, insurance companies, and hedge funds. Or, alternatively, they can merely blackmail these organizations.
It's likely that the probe Ron Paul has been pushing---audit the Federal Reserve---has already been done by those who control unlimited global surveillance. They already know far more than any Congressional investigation will uncover. If they know the deepest truths, they can use them to blackmail, manipulate, and control the Fed itself.
Corruption on top of corruption.
In this global-surveillance world, we need to ask new questions and think along different lines now.
For example, how long before the mortgage-derivative crisis hit did the Masters of Surveillance know, from spying on bank records, that insupportable debt was accumulating at a lethal pace? What did they do with that information?
When did they know that at least a trillion dollars was missing from Pentagon accounting books (as Donald Rumsfeld eventually admitted), and what did they do with that information?
Did they discover precisely where the trillion dollars went? Did they discover where billions of dollars, in cash, shipped to post-war Iraq, disappeared to?
When did they know the details of the Libor rate-fixing scandal? Press reports indicate that Barclays was trying to rig interest rates as early as January 2005.
Have they tracked, in detail, the men responsible for recruiting hired mercenaries and terrorists, who eventually wound up in Syria pretending to be an authentic rebel force?
Have they discovered the truth about how close or how far away Iran is from producing a nuclear weapon?
Have they collected detailed accounts of the most private plans of Bilderberg, CFR, and Trilateral Commission leaders?
For global surveillance kings, what we think of as the future is, in many respects the present and the past.
It's a new world. These overseers of universal information-detection can enter and probe the most secret caches of data, collect, collate, cross reference, and assemble them into vital bottom-lines. By comparison, an operation like Wikileaks is an old Model-T Ford puttering down a country road, and Julian Assange is a mere piker.
Previously, we thought we needed to look over the shoulders of the men who were committing major crimes out of public view. But now, if we want to be up to date, we also have to factor in the men who are spying on those criminals, who are gathering up those secrets and using them to commit their own brand of meta-crime.
And in the financial arena, that means we think of Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan as perpetrators, yes, but we also think about the men who already know everything about GS and Morgan, and are using this knowledge to steal sums that might make GS and Morgan blush with envy.
Therefore....when looking for who might have helped
Ed Snowden punch a hole in NSA, we should think about who the NSA has been spying on. Not the little guy, not the medium-sized guy, but a very big guy. Perhaps a Goldman Sachs or a JP Morgan.
At the highest levels of criminal power, the players don't always agree. It's not always a smooth conspiracy. There is fierce in-fighting as well.
Goldman Sachs, Chase, and Morgan consider trillion-dollar trading markets their own private golden-egg farm. They run it, they own it, they manipulate it for their own ends.
If NSA has been looking over their shoulders for the past 30 years, discovering all their knowledge, and operating a meta invasion, siphoning off enormous profits, NSA would rate as Enemy Number One.
And would need to be torpedoed.
Enter Ed Snowden.
Looking elsewhere, consider this. Snowden worked for the CIA. He was pushed up the ranks quickly, from an IT position in the US to a posting in Geneva, under diplomatic cover, to run security on the CIA's computer systems there.
Then, Snowden quit the CIA and eventually ended up at Booz Allen, a private contractor. He was assigned to NSA, where he stole the secrets and exposed the NSA.
The CIA and NSA have a long contentious relationship. The major issue is, who is king of US intelligence? We're talking about an internal war.
Snowden could have been the CIA's man at NSA, where certain CIA players helped him access files he wouldn't have been able to tap otherwise.
You can bet your bottom dollar that NSA analysts are looking into this possibility right now.
Jon Rappoport
The author of an explosive collection, THE MATRIX REVEALED, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power
to audiences around the world. www.nomorefakenews.com
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How can NSA whistleblower Snowden be guilty of treason if the NSA claims it isn't spying on you after all?
by Mike Adams
Wednesday, June 12, 2013
(NaturalNews) All across the mainstream media, you're hearing Republicans and Democrats accuse
Edward Snowden of "treason" for blowing the whistle on the NSA surveillance scandal. Feinstein, Boehner, Bolton and others are all joining in the chorus of the absurd by screaming about how Edward Snowden is a "traitor" to the United States because he betrayed the nation by disclosing highly sensitive secrets.
But at the same time, the NSA claims it isn't spying on you at all. National intelligence director James Clapper says, "The notion that we are trolling through everyone's emails, and voyeuristically reading them, or listening to everyone's phone calls, is on its face absurd. We couldn't do it even if we wanted to, and I assure you, we don't want to."
So then how is Edward Snowden guilty of treason if everything he leaked isn't true?
See, treason can only apply if Snowden's leaks are factually correct. So by claiming he's guilty of treason, people like Sen. Feinstein are actually admitting his leaked PRISM slides are, in fact, correct and true. That's why they're so angry about it...
Because someone can't be guilty of treason for making up their own fictional slides and handing them to the Guardian. That's not treason... that's just a prank. And according to the NSA, Snowden is engaged in nothing more than a giant prank. James Clapper and everyone else in the intelligence apparatus denies the government is spying on you at all. Therefore, Snowden can't be engaged in "
treason" because the information he leaked isn't real.
In other words, the two statements that "Snowden is a traitor" and "the information he leaked isn't true" can't both be accurate.
Treason doesn't apply to Snowden even if the information is true
But there's more to this story: "Treason" doesn't apply to Snowden even if the information he leaked is true (which it is, by the way, and that explains why people like Feinstein are frothing at the mouth, freaking out over it).
As Evan Soltas correctly points out at Bloomberg.com, Snowden's leaking of documents:
...wasn't treason under U.S. law. Article III of the Constitution defines it narrowly: It "shall consist only in levying War against'' the U.S., "or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort." Judges have read that to mean joining enemy military forces or giving them intelligence directly. Snowden did neither. He sent documents to two newspapers.
Even more abhorrently, Sen. Feinstein recently said Snowden was guilty of treason because he "violated his oath as a government employee to uphold the Constitution," reports
Breitbart.com.
So wait... the Senator who is on the record as the most vicious aggressor against the Bill of Rights and the Second Amendment is now accusing Snowden of violating his oath to the government? Does Feinstein have no memory of her own oath to "protect and defend" the Constitution of the United States of America?
Sen. Feinstein calling Snowden a traitor is a lot like a child rapist calling a serial flasher a pervert.
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NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'I don't want to live in a society that does these sort of things'
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Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations
Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill and Laura Poitras in Hong Kong guardian.co.uk,
Sunday 9 June 2013
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/09/edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance
The individual responsible for one of the most significant leaks in US political history is
Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old former technical assistant for the CIA and current employee of the defence contractor Booz Allen Hamilton. Snowden has been working at the National Security Agency for the last four years as an employee of various outside contractors, including Booz Allen and Dell.
The Guardian, after several days of interviews, is revealing his identity at his request. From the moment he decided to disclose numerous top-secret documents to the public, he was determined not to opt for the protection of anonymity. "I have no intention of hiding who I am because I know I have done nothing wrong," he said.
Snowden will go down in history as one of America's most consequential whistleblowers, alongside Daniel Ellsberg and Bradley Manning. He is responsible for handing over material from one of the world's most secretive organisations – the NSA.
In a note accompanying the first set of documents he provided, he wrote: "I understand that I will be made to suffer for my actions," but "I will be satisfied if the federation of secret law, unequal pardon and irresistible executive powers that rule the world that I love are revealed even for an instant."
Despite his determination to be publicly unveiled, he repeatedly insisted that he wants to avoid the media spotlight. "I don't want public attention because I don't want the story to be about me. I want it to be about what the US government is doing."
He does not fear the consequences of going public, he said, only that doing so will distract attention from the issues raised by his disclosures. "I know the media likes to personalise political debates, and I know the government will demonise me."
Despite these fears, he remained hopeful his outing will not divert attention from the substance of his disclosures. "I really want the focus to be on these documents and the debate which I hope this will trigger among citizens around the globe about what kind of world we want to live in." He added: "My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them."
He has had "a very comfortable life" that included a salary of roughly $200,000, a girlfriend with whom he shared a home in Hawaii, a stable career, and a family he loves. "I'm willing to sacrifice all of that because I can't in good conscience allow the US government to destroy privacy, internet freedom and basic liberties for people around the world with this massive surveillance machine they're secretly building."
'I am not afraid, because this is the choice I've made'
Three weeks ago, Snowden made final preparations that resulted in last week's series of blockbuster news stories. At the NSA office in Hawaii where he was working, he copied the last set of documents he intended to disclose.
He then advised his NSA supervisor that he needed to be away from work for "a couple of weeks" in order to receive treatment for epilepsy, a condition he learned he suffers from after a series of seizures last year.
As he packed his bags, he told his girlfriend that he had to be away for a few weeks, though he said he was vague about the reason. "That is not an uncommon occurrence for someone who has spent the last decade working in the intelligence world."
On May 20, he boarded a flight to Hong Kong, where he has remained ever since. He chose the city because "they have a spirited commitment to free speech and the right of political dissent", and because he believed that it was one of the few places in the world that both could and would resist the dictates of the US government.
In the three weeks since he arrived, he has been ensconced in a hotel room. "I've left the room maybe a total of three times during my entire stay," he said. It is a plush hotel and, what with eating meals in his room too, he has run up big bills.
He is deeply worried about being spied on. He lines the door of his hotel room with pillows to prevent eavesdropping. He puts a large red hood over his head and laptop when entering his passwords to prevent any hidden cameras from detecting them.
Though that may sound like paranoia to some, Snowden has good reason for such fears. He worked in the US intelligence world for almost a decade. He knows that the biggest and most secretive surveillance organisation in America, the NSA, along with the most powerful government on the planet, is looking for him.
Since the disclosures began to emerge, he has watched television and monitored the internet, hearing all the threats and vows of prosecution emanating from Washington.
And he knows only too well the sophisticated technology available to them and how easy it will be for them to find him. The NSA police and other law enforcement officers have twice visited his home in Hawaii and already contacted his girlfriend, though he believes that may have been prompted by his absence from work, and not because of suspicions of any connection to the leaks.
"All my options are bad," he said. The US could begin extradition proceedings against him, a potentially problematic, lengthy and unpredictable course for Washington. Or the Chinese government might whisk him away for questioning, viewing him as a useful source of information. Or he might end up being grabbed and bundled into a plane bound for US territory.
"Yes, I could be rendered by the CIA. I could have people come after me. Or any of the third-party partners. They work closely with a number of other nations. Or they could pay off the Triads. Any of their agents or assets," he said.
"We have got a CIA station just up the road – the consulate here in Hong Kong – and I am sure they are going to be busy for the next week. And that is a concern I will live with for the rest of my life, however long that happens to be."
Having watched the Obama administration prosecute whistleblowers at a historically unprecedented rate, he fully expects the US government to attempt to use all its weight to punish him. "I am not afraid," he said calmly, "because this is the choice I've made."
He predicts the government will launch an investigation and "say I have broken the Espionage Act and helped our enemies, but that can be used against anyone who points out how massive and invasive the system has become".
The only time he became emotional during the many hours of interviews was when he pondered the impact his choices would have on his family, many of whom work for the US government. "The only thing I fear is the harmful effects on my family, who I won't be able to help any more. That's what keeps me up at night," he said, his eyes welling up with tears.
'You can't wait around for someone else to act'Snowden did not always believe the US government posed a threat to his political values. He was brought up originally in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. His family moved later to Maryland, near the NSA headquarters in Fort Meade.
By his own admission, he was not a stellar student. In order to get the credits necessary to obtain a high school diploma, he attended a community college in Maryland, studying computing, but never completed the coursework. (He later obtained his GED.)
In 2003, he enlisted in the US army and began a training program to join the Special Forces. Invoking the same principles that he now cites to justify his leaks, he said: "I wanted to fight in the Iraq war because I felt like I had an obligation as a human being to help free people from oppression".
He recounted how his beliefs about the war's purpose were quickly dispelled. "Most of the people training us seemed pumped up about killing Arabs, not helping anyone," he said. After he broke both his legs in a training accident, he was discharged.
After that, he got his first job in an NSA facility, working as a security guard for one of the agency's covert facilities at the University of Maryland. From there, he went to the CIA, where he worked on IT security. His understanding of the internet and his talent for computer programming enabled him to rise fairly quickly for someone who lacked even a high school diploma.
By 2007, the CIA stationed him with diplomatic cover in Geneva, Switzerland. His responsibility for maintaining computer network security meant he had clearance to access a wide array of classified documents.
That access, along with the almost three years he spent around CIA officers, led him to begin seriously questioning the rightness of what he saw.
He described as formative an incident in which he claimed CIA operatives were attempting to recruit a Swiss banker to obtain secret banking information. Snowden said they achieved this by purposely getting the banker drunk and encouraging him to drive home in his car. When the banker was arrested for drunk driving, the undercover agent seeking to befriend him offered to help, and a bond was formed that led to successful recruitment.
"Much of what I saw in Geneva really disillusioned me about how my government functions and what its impact is in the world," he says. "I realised that I was part of something that was doing far more harm than good."
He said it was during his CIA stint in Geneva that he thought for the first time about exposing government secrets. But, at the time, he chose not to for two reasons.
First, he said: "Most of the secrets the CIA has are about people, not machines and systems, so I didn't feel comfortable with disclosures that I thought could endanger anyone". Secondly, the election of Barack Obama in 2008 gave him hope that there would be real reforms, rendering disclosures unnecessary.
He left the CIA in 2009 in order to take his first job working for a private contractor that assigned him to a functioning NSA facility, stationed on a military base in Japan. It was then, he said, that he "watched as Obama advanced the very policies that I thought would be reined in", and as a result, "I got hardened."
The primary lesson from this experience was that "you can't wait around for someone else to act. I had been looking for leaders, but I realised that leadership is about being the first to act."
Over the next three years, he learned just how all-consuming the NSA's surveillance activities were, claiming "they are intent on making every conversation and every form of behaviour in the world known to them".
He described how he once viewed the internet as "the most important invention in all of human history". As an adolescent, he spent days at a time "speaking to people with all sorts of views that I would never have encountered on my own".
But he believed that the value of the internet, along with basic privacy, is being rapidly destroyed by ubiquitous surveillance. "I don't see myself as a hero," he said, "because what I'm doing is self-interested: I don't want to live in a world where there's no privacy and therefore no room for intellectual exploration and creativity."
Once he reached the conclusion that the NSA's surveillance net would soon be irrevocable, he said it was just a matter of time before he chose to act. "What they're doing" poses "an existential threat to democracy", he said.
A matter of principleAs strong as those beliefs are, there still remains the question: why did he do it? Giving up his freedom and a privileged lifestyle? "There are more important things than money. If I were motivated by money, I could have sold these documents to any number of countries and gotten very rich."For him, it is a matter of principle. "The government has granted itself power it is not entitled to. There is no public oversight. The result is people like myself have the latitude to go further than they are allowed to," he said.
His allegiance to internet freedom is reflected in the stickers on his laptop: "I support Online Rights: Electronic Frontier Foundation," reads one. Another hails the online organisation offering anonymity, the Tor Project.
Asked by reporters to establish his authenticity to ensure he is not some fantasist, he laid bare, without hesitation, his personal details, from his social security number to his CIA ID and his expired diplomatic passport. There is no shiftiness. Ask him about anything in his personal life and he will answer.
He is quiet, smart, easy-going and self-effacing. A master on computers, he seemed happiest when talking about the technical side of surveillance, at a level of detail comprehensible probably only to fellow communication specialists. But he showed intense passion when talking about the value of privacy and how he felt it was being steadily eroded by the behaviour of the intelligence services.
His manner was calm and relaxed but he has been understandably twitchy since he went into hiding, waiting for the knock on the hotel door. A fire alarm goes off. "That has not happened before," he said, betraying anxiety wondering if was real, a test or a CIA ploy to get him out onto the street.
Strewn about the side of his bed are his suitcase, a plate with the remains of room-service breakfast, and a copy of Angler, the biography of former vice-president Dick Cheney.
Ever since last week's news stories began to appear in the Guardian, Snowden has vigilantly watched TV and read the internet to see the effects of his choices. He seemed satisfied that the debate he longed to provoke was finally taking place.
He lay, propped up against pillows, watching CNN's Wolf Blitzer ask a discussion panel about government intrusion if they had any idea who the leaker was. From 8,000 miles away, the leaker looked on impassively, not even indulging in a wry smile.
Snowden said that he admires both Ellsberg and Manning, but argues that there is one important distinction between himself and the army private, whose trial coincidentally began the week Snowden's leaks began to make news.
"I carefully evaluated every single document I disclosed to ensure that each was legitimately in the public interest," he said. "There are all sorts of documents that would have made a big impact that I didn't turn over, because harming people isn't my goal. Transparency is."
He purposely chose, he said, to give the documents to journalists whose judgment he trusted about what should be public and what should remain concealed.
As for his future, he is vague. He hoped the publicity the leaks have generated will offer him some protection, making it "harder for them to get dirty".
He views his best hope as the possibility of asylum, with Iceland – with its reputation of a champion of internet freedom – at the top of his list. He knows that may prove a wish unfulfilled.
But after the intense political controversy he has already created with just the first week's haul of stories, "I feel satisfied that this was all worth it. I have no regrets."
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