Saturday, March 22, 2014

Is Putin Another Hitler?

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The Rise of Putin and The Fall of The Russian-Jewish Oligarchs
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How Vladimir Putin came to power (full documentary) Russia  
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Enough of the Putin Worship!
March 27, 2014
(Left: Grand Master Putin. But his game is poker, not chess.)
"We will strive to ensure a new world order, one that meets current geopolitical realities, and one that develops smoothly and without unnecessary upheaval."
Oh, how Putin hates the Jews and New World Order!
"I recently had a talk with Henry Kissinger. I meet with him regularly. I fully share this consummate professional’s thesis that close and trusting interactions between Moscow and Washington are particularly important in periods of international turbulence."
Putin in '
Russia and the Changing World' 2012.
Russia's central bank is Rothschild and oversaw the proliferation of commercial banking in post-Soviet Russia. 'Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws'......
Who created the Oil boom that allowed Russia to rebuild its army? Why, the US Empire in its quest to defend the Petrodollar of course! When will we learn about multi faceted strategy coming together? The Money Power's strategists are good at what they do and this is just a case in point.
Putin did not kill Oligarchic rule in Russia, what nonsense! He pushed back Berezhovsky and Khodorovsky, because they were a threat to the Russian State, which the Money Power needs to be strong and centralized. The Putin - Oligarch deal is quite clear: The Kremlin for him, the economy for them.
Why is he not providing interest-free money to the people? Why is the population in Russia still tanking after 15 years of his rule? Where did all the Oil money go besides the Oligarchs and the weapons industry? Why is he not exposing the bankers that are running this show? Why is he pretending this is a conflict of nations?
And why is Putin so assertive? Because China is behind him.
We want to take sides, but Russia is just another Empire and would love to rule the world if the US were not in the way. 'They' always have us choose between evil and lesser evil, but when are we going to make some choices of our own?
Managed Conflict is the goal and the means on the road to World Government.
The decapitation of the US Empire and the Dollar is longstanding Money Power policy. The US is a Colussus on clay feet, it's already dead. Anybody can see that.
Babylon is bigger than the US, bigger than Jewry. It's temporal power and it is One. Its core is the Capitalist global monopoly, encompassing first and foremost banking and secondary all major Transnationals.
World Government is just the externalization of the age old hierarchy.
Enough of the Putin worship! Give Peace a Chance!
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Putin puts fear of God in New World Order
Saturday, March 22nd, 2014
In the wake of Crimea’s independence referendum, Hillary Clinton says Russian President Putin is a "new Hitler." Zbigniew Brezezinski, former National Security Advisor agrees, calling Putin not just another Hitler, but also a thug, a menace, a Mafia gangster, and a Mussolini. The Western mainstream media echoes this c
childish name-calling.
Why is the whole Western foreign policy establishment so afraid of Putin?
Because Putin is standing up against Western aggression – not only in Ukraine, but also in Syria and Iran. Ongoing Western attempts to destabilize these and other countries are just the most recent examples of a decades-old pattern of aggression. The long-term goal: Total destruction of traditional nations and values, and the creation of a New World Order global dictatorship.
Since the 1953 CIA-MI6 coup in Iran, the West has been using the same formula to overthrow legitimate but uncooperative leaders: First, sabotage the country’s economy. Then bribe corrupt military officers and thugs and pay rent-a-mobs to create chaos in the streets. Next (this step is optional) incite violence by paying snipers to fire into crowds – and maybe set off some bombs. Finally, send the corrupt military units and gangsters to overthrow the target nation’s legitimate leader, murder or imprison his supporters, install a Western puppet in his place – and announce that "order has been restored."
The CIA did it to Iran’s democratically-elected Prime Minister Mossadegh in 1953, to Indonesia’s President Sukarno in 1965, and to Chile’s Prime Minister Allende on September 11th, 1973. They did the same thing to Ukraine’s legitimate president, Viktor Yanukovych, a few weeks ago. Neocon regime-change apparatchik Victoria Nuland (The assistant US secretary of state,) got caught admitting that the US had spent five billion dollars to overthrow Ukraine’s democratically-elected government; and EU Foreign Affairs Chief Catherine Ashton was heard on tape discussing the "news" that the Maidan Square snipers were part of the US-sponsored coup.
The people of Ukraine should be worried. US-sponsored coups can turn very bloody very quickly.
The CIA’s 1965 Indonesia coup was one of the biggest holocausts in history. According to Princeton history professor Bradley Simpson, as cited by the Jakarta Globe: "The US and British governments did everything in their power to ensure that the Indonesian army would carry out the mass killings" of more than one million people following the coup against Sukarno. Most of the victims were tortured before they were murdered. The list of names of people to be tortured and murdered was provided by the CIA to their hired Indonesian thugs. While this was going on, five-year-old Barrack Obama was living in Indonesia with his stepfather Lolo Soetoro, who was working for the American mass murderers.
That’s right: Obama’s stepfather was a holocaust perpetrator.
In 1971, following the CIA’s coup in Chile, the American stooge Pinochet murdered 3,000 people and tortured 30,000. These actions were fully supported by Pinochet’s American sponsors, who trained and paid the thugs and torturers.
The hecatomb in Syria, too, is best understood as yet another US-sponsored coup attempt.
The NWO-driven Americans and their Western allies have killed tens of millions in these coups, interventions, destabilization campaigns, and undeclared wars. According to AndrĂ© Vltchek and Noam Chomsky’s book On Western Terrorism, the total number killed is over 50 million since World War II. If we add to this the number of people tortured, brutalized, falsely imprisoned, forced to become refugees, or who had their lives ruined by Western terrorism, the number of victims reaches the hundreds of millions.
Today, the American terrorists and their NATO allies seem less interested in installing puppet governments than in reducing entire nations to chaos. The CIA-NATO coup against Gaddafi has destroyed Libya as a modern nation-state. Western-backed false-flag terror in Iraq is splitting up that country. Syria is being decimated by a Western-backed attempt to overthrow Assad. Venezuela, too, is being destabilized by a CIA-backed coup effort.
In short, the New World Order – a shadowy group of global banking oligarchs bent on establishing a one-world dictatorship – is trying to overthrow every leader on earth who resists. Russian President Putin is resisting. That is why the Western propaganda machine is calling him names.
It is worth noting that Russia and Iran – the two nations most successfully resisting NWO regime change – are doing so in the name of God.
According to Catholic intellectual E. Michael Jones, the 1979 Iranian Revolution was the opening salvo of a global backlash against secularism’s destruction of traditional values. Like the 1980 election of Ronald Reagan (driven by Americans’ disgust with the so-called sexual revolution) and the rise of Poland’s Solidarity movement (which opposed communist atheism), the establishment of the Islamic Republic of Iran was a landmark event signaling an end to the 20th-century wave of militant secularism and atheism – and a revival of traditional religion.
President Putin enjoys overwhelming popularity in Russia due to his defense of traditional religious values. In his State of the Nation address last December, Putin said: "Many Euro-Atlantic countries have moved away from their roots, including Christian values… Policies are being pursued that place on the same level a multi-child family and a same-sex partnership, a faith in God and a belief in Satan."
Putin’s reference to Satanism was a pointed rebuke to the New World Order elites, who – though they push militant secularism on the societies they are trying to undermine – are closet Satanists. Anyone who doubts this should run the name "Lt. Col. Michael Aquino" through a search engine. Aquino, an avowed Satanist and credibly-accused mass child abuser, was rewarded for his crimes against children with an appointment as Chief of Psychological Warfare for the US military. (For background on the satanic international banking elite, and its near-total control of Western institutions, read Nick Bryant’s book The Franklin Scandal alongside the work of Canadian scholar Henry Makow.)
The shock troops of the NWO’s war against religion and tradition (and Russia and Iran) are the neoconservatives. Operation Gladio terrorist Michael Ledeen explains: "Creative destruction is our middle name, both within our society and abroad. We tear down the old order every day, from business to science, literature, art, architecture, and cinema to politics and the law. Our enemies have always hated this whirlwind of energy and creativity which menaces their traditions (whatever they may be) and shames them for their inability to keep pace … We must destroy them to advance our historic mission."
Putin is stopping New World Order "creative destruction" in Syria and Ukraine. He is part of a growing coalition opposing the NWO – not just religious traditionalists, but also progressive anti-globalization forces, including Hugo Chavez inspired anti-imperialists in Latin America.
We are facing an epic struggle between those who espouse sacred values such as justice and decency versus those who wish to destroy all values.
God bless President Putin, who is putting the fear of God into the New World Order.
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7 Remarkable Stories Of Vladimir Putin Being One Of The World's Most Brutal Thugs
Adam Taylor
17 June 2013
This weekend, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft went public with claims that Russian President Vladimir Putin stole his 2004 Super Bowl ring during his visit to Russia in 2005.
Here's how Kraft described the incident
to the New York Post:
"I took out the ring and showed it to [Putin], and he put it on and he goes, ‘I can kill someone with this ring,’ " Kraft told the crowd at Carnegie Hall’s Medal of Excellence gala at the Waldorf-Astoria."I put my hand out and he put it in his pocket, and three KGB guys got around him and walked out."
Even though Putin's
spokespeople are denying the story, it's still incredibly hard to imagine a similar accusation being made about the leader of any other major world power. Could you imagine Barack Obama, Xi Jinping, or Angela Merkel being accused of a casual and petty theft?
To anyone who has been following Putin for a long time, however, the story makes sense. In Putin's personal history there have long been rumors and reports of petty thuggishness and abrupt rudeness when dealing with others.
Here are seven examples:
Firstly, the ring theft has already been described in a book by Russian journalist Masha Gessen, "
The Man Without a Face." In her description of it actually sounds a little worse than in Kraft's telling of the story.
REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov
Here's how Gessen
described the ring transaction:
Several times, at least one of them embarrassingly public, Putin has acted like a person afflicted with kleptomania. In June 2005, while hosting a group of American businessmen in St Petersburg, Putin pocketed the 124-diamond Super Bowl ring of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft. He had asked to see it, tried it on, allegedly said, ''I could kill someone with this'', then stuck it in his pocket and left the room abruptly. After a flurry of articles in the US press, Kraft announced a few days later that the ring had been a gift - preventing an uncomfortable situation from spiralling out of control.
This isn't the only time Putin has been accused of petty theft.
REUTERS/Kirill Kudryavtsev
Gessen goes on to describe another, even more brazen moment, when Putin allegedly had his bodyguards steal a glass Kalashnikjov filled with vodka from the Guggenheim:
In September 2005, Putin was a guest at New York's Guggenheim Museum. At one point his hosts brought out a conversation piece another Russian guest must have given the museum: a glass replica of a Kalashnikov automatic weapon filled with vodka. The gaudy souvenir costs $300 in Moscow. Putin nodded to one of his bodyguards, who took the glass Kalashnikov and carried it out of the room, leaving the hosts speechless.
Gessen goes on to argue that Putin suffers not from kleptomania, but the more obscure pleonexia — "the insatiable desire to have what rightfully belongs to others."
Putin has been accused of far bigger scams too.
Reuters
In Gessen's book she also describes how, in 1991, Putin, then deputy mayor of St. Petersburg, allegedly organized a number of scams involving meat imports into the poor, starving city. This drive is believed by many to have enabled Putin to make himself fabulously wealthy — with reports of his wealth ranging from $40 billion to an incredible $70 billion.
Even powerful oligarchs who've challenged him have forfeited their personal fortunes to the Russian state.
AP
Mikhail Khodorkovsky was once Russia's richest man, one of the original
oligarches who got seriously rich by taking over energy giant Yukos during the "Wild East" Russia of the 1990s. However, after he gave a presentation on corruption in Russia to Putin and other business leaders, the Russian state began pursuing Khodorkovsky and other Yukos employees for tax evasion. Khodorkovsky was arrested in 2003 and has been in prison ever since.
Here's how Gessen describes Putin's reactions to Khordokovsky's corruption presentation
in an article for Vanity Fair:
The person who did comment was Putin. To those who knew Putin, it was clear from a characteristic smirk on his face that he was livid. "Some companies, including Yukos, have extraordinary reserves," he said. "The question is: How did the company get them?" He shifted in his chair to raise his right shoulder in a gesture that made him seem larger. His thuggish smile made it plain that he was making a threat, not asking for information. "And your company had its own issues with taxes. To give the Yukos leadership its due, it found a way to settle everything and take care of all its problems with the state. But maybe this is the reason there is such competition to get into the tax academy?" Putin was accusing Khodorkovsky of having bribed tax inspectors. Between the lines, he was also threatening a takeover of Yukos.
However, it's not all to do with personal enrichment. Putin is notorious for being late to meetings with foreign officials — reportedly keeping John Kerry waiting for
three hours earlier this year, for example.
AP
"This habitual lateness of Putin's can be read in different ways, as a character trait or his way of demonstrating his attitude toward others," Andrei Kolesnikov,
opinion editor of the Moscow-based opposition newspaper Novaya Gazeta said last year. "But only God is above him now. He's person No. 1, and he can afford to be late whenever he wants."
At the beginning of his presidency, Putin gained support for his tough response to a series of devastating bombings on apartment buildings in Russia reportedly by terrorists in Chechnya and Dagestan. However, there's been a long-running, and somewhat credible, rumor that the FSB (the successor agency to the KGB) engineered the bombings as a "false flag" to garner support for Putin and a new war in Chechnya.
AP
More than a thousand people were injured, and 293 people were killed in the bombings. Putin, for his part, has specifically denied any knowledge of a plot in his biography "First Person,"
published in 2000:
"What?! Blowing up our own apartment buildings? You know, that is really…utter nonsense! It’s totally insane. No one in the Russian special services would be capable of such a crime against his own people."
In his personal life there have also been accusations of dodgy behavior. In the 1980s, during his time as a KGB agent in East Germany,
German intelligence reports described him as a "philanderer and a wife-beater."

AP
When Putin and his wife announced their divorce earlier this month, it was only after years of reports of dalliances with younger women, including former gymnast Alina Kabaeva and his personal photographer Yana Lapikova.
These stories have been around for years, and Putin himself does little to deny them. The Russian president's upbringing in Leningrad,
a city nearly starved out of existence by a Nazi blockade during World War II, was notoriously tough, and Putin himself has played up the thuggishness of his attitude at the time — even his official biography for the 2012 election remarked that he was a "bully, not a pioneer" during this time. He was never part of the Moscow-elite, and spent much of his career in the KGB as an outsider.
Many observers believe this tough background helped craft a leader who, depending on your perspective, was either endearingly tenacious or worryingly ruthless. Either way, it goes a long way to explaining why he's been at the top of Russian politics for 13 years with virtually no challengers to his throne.
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The Putin Murders
A Brief History of Putintime
 
March 1997
45-year-old former KGB agent Vladimir Putin (pictured, left) is plucked from obscurity out of the St. Petersburg local government apparatus by President Boris Yeltsin and named Deputy Chief of Staff. In June, he defends his PhD dissertation in "strategic planning" at St. Petersburg’s Mining Institute. Later, this document proves to have been plagiarized from a KGB translation of work by U.S. professors published many years earlier (as if nobody would notice, and in fact for quite a while nobody did).
July 1998

In a second inexplicable move, Yeltsin names Putin head of the KGB (now called the FSB).

November 1998

Less than four months after Putin takes over at the KGB, opposition Duma Deputy Galina Starovoitova (pictured, right), the most

prominent pro-democracy Kremlin critic in the nation, is murdered at her apartment building in St. Petersburg. Four months after that, Putin will play a key role in silencing the Russian Attorney General, Yury Skuratov, who was investigating high-level corruption in the Kremlin, by airing an illicit sex video involving Skuratov on national TV. Four months after the dust settles in the Skuratov affair, Putin will be named Prime Minister.

August 1999

Completing a hat trick of bizarre spontaneous promotions, proud KGB spy Putin is named by Yeltsin Prime Minister of Russia. Almost immediately, Putin orders a massive bombing campaign against the tiny, defenseless breakaway republic of Chechnya, apparently seeing the reassertion of Russian power there as key to overall resurgence of Russia’s military and state security apparatus, his primary political objective. On August 26th, he’s forced to acknowledge the horrific consequences of the bombing. Hundreds of civilians are killed and tens of thousands are left homeless as civilian targets are attacked. World opinion begins to turn starkly against Russia, especially in Europe, very similarly to the manner in which it has polarized against U.S. President George Bush over Iraq. Putin’s poll numbers in Russia begin to slide.

September 1999

An apartment building in the Pechatniki neighborhood of Moscow is blown up by a bomb. 94 are killed. Less than a week later a second bomb destroys a building in Moscow’s Kashirskoye neighborhood, killing 118. Days after that, a massive contingent of Russian soldiers is surrounding Chechnya as public opposition to the war evaporates. On October 1st, Putin declares Chechen president Aslan Maskhadov and his parliament illegitimate. Russian forces invade.
New Year’s Eve, 1999
Boris Yeltsin resigns the presidency of Russia, handing the office to Putin in order to allow him to run as an incumbent three months later. Given the pattern of bizarre promotions Putin has previously received, the move is hardly even surprising. So-called "experts" on Russia scoff at the possibility that Putin could be elected, proclaiming that, having tasted freedom, Russia can "never go back" to the dark days of the USSR.
March 2000
Despite being the nominee of a man, Yeltsin, who enjoyed single-digit public approval ratings in polls, Vladimir Putin is elected "president" of Russia in a massive landslide (he wins nearly twice as many votes as his nearest competitor). Shortly thereafter, all hell breaks loose in Chechnya. Russia will ultimately be convicted of human rights violations before the European Court for Human Rights and condemned for its abuses of the civilian population by every human rights organization under the sun.
[Between April 2000 and March 2002, Russia plunges into a nightmarish conflict in Chechnya eerily similar to what America now faces in Iraq. Opposition journalists, especially those who dare to report on what it going on in Chechnya, suddenly start dying. In 2000 alone, reporters Igor Domnikov, Sergey Novikov, Iskandar Khatloni, Sergey Ivanov and Adam Tepsurgayev are murdered -- not by hostile fire in Chechnya but in blatant assassinations at home in Russia. On June 16, 2001, at a press conference in Brdo Pri Kranju, Slovenia, President Bush is asked about Putin: "Is this a man that Americans can trust?" Bush replies: "I will answer the question. I looked the man in the eye. I found him to be very straightforward and trustworthy. We had a very good dialogue. I was able to get a sense of his soul; a man deeply committed to his country and the best interests of his country. And I appreciated so very much the frank dialogue."]
April 2003
Sergei Yushenkov, co-chairman of the Liberal Russia political party (pictured, left), is gunned down at the entrance of his Moscow apartment block. Yushenkov had been serving as the vice chair of the group known as the "Kovalev Commission" which was formed to informally investigate charges that Putin’s KGB had planted the Pechatniki and Kashirskoye apartment bombs to whip up support for the Putin’s war in Chechnya after the formal legislative investigation turned out to be impossible. Another member of the Commission, Yuri Shchekochikhin (see below) will perish of poisoning, a third will be severely beaten by thugs, and two other members will lose their seats in the Duma. The Commission’s lawyer, Mikhail Trepashkin (see below) will be jailed after a secret trial on espionage charges. Today, virtually none of the members of the Commission are left whole and it is silent.
May 2003
Putin’s popularity in opinion polls slips below 50% after sliding precipitously while the conflict in Chechnya became increasingly bloody. Suddenly, he begins to appear vulnerable, and oil billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky begins to be discussed as one who could unseat him. All hell breaks loose in Russian politics.
July 2003
Yuri Shchekochikhin (pictured, right), a vocal opposition journalist and member
of the Russian Duma and the Kovalev Commission, suddenly contracts a mysterious illness. Witnesses reported: "He complained about fatigue, and red blotches began to appear on his skin. His internal organs began collapsing one by one. Then he lost almost all his hair." One of Shchekochikhin’s last newspaper articles before his death was entitled "Are we Russia or KGB of Soviet Union?" In it, he described such issues as the refusal of the FSB to explain to the Russian Parliament what poison gas was applied during the Moscow theater hostage crisis, and work of secret services from the former Soviet republic of Turkmenistan, which operated with impunity in Moscow against Russian citizens of Turkoman origin. According to Wikipedia: "He also tried to investigate the Three Whales Corruption Scandal and criminal activities of FSB officers related to money laundering through the Bank of New York and illegal actions of Yevgeny Adamov, a former Russian Minister of Nuclear Energy. This case was under the personal control of Putin. In June of 2003, Shchekochikhin contacted the FBI and got an American visa to discuss the case with US authorities. However, he never made it to the USA because of his sudden death on July 3rd. The Russian authorities refused to allow an autopsy, but according to Wikipedia his relatives "managed to send a specimen of his skin to London, where a tentative diagnosis was made of poisoning with thallium" (a poison commonly used by the KGB, at first suspected in the Litvinenko killing).
October 2003
Assaults on the enemies of the Kremlin reach fever pitch as the election cycle begins. Within one week at the end of the month, two major opposition figures are in prison.
October 22, 2003
Mikhail Trepashkin (pictured, right), a former KGB spy and the attorney for the
Kovalev Commission, is arrested for illegal possession of a firearm (which he claims was planted in his vehicle). Also retain to represent some of the victims of the apartment bombings theselves, Trepashkin allegedly uncovered a trail of a mysterious suspect whose description had disappeared from the files and learned that the man was one of his former FSB colleagues. He also found a witness who testified that evidence was doctored to lead the investigation away from incriminating the FSB. The weapons charge against Trepashkin mysteriously morphs into a spying charge handled by a closed military proceeding that is condemned by the U.S. government as being a blatant sham, and Trepashkin is sent to prison for four years. Publius Pundit reported on Trepashkin’s plight back in early December of last year.
October 25, 2003
Just as the presidential election cycle is beginning, Khodorkovsky (pictured, left) is arrested at the airport in Novosibirsk. He will be tried and convicted for tax fraud and sent to Siberia, just like in the bad old days of the USSR, in a show trial all international observers condemn as rigged (his lawyer has documented the legal violations in a 75-page treatise). He is there today, now facing a second prosecution for the same offense. His company, YUKOS, is being slowly gobbled up by the Kremlin.
March 2004
With Khodorkovsky conveniently in prison and the Kovalev Commission conveniently muzzled, Vladimir Putin is re-elected "president" of Russia, again in a landslide despite his poll numbers. He faces no serious competition from any opposition candidate. He does not participate in any debates. He wins a ghastly, Soviet-like 70% of the vote. Immediately, talk begins of a neo-Soviet state, with Putin assuming the powers of a dictator. The most public and powerful enemies of the regime start dropping like flies.
June 2004
Nikolai Girenko (pictured, left), a prominent human rights defender, Professor of Ethnology and expert on racism and discrimination in the Russian Federation is shot dead in his home in St Petersburg. Girenko’s work has been crucial in ensuring that racially motivated assaults are classified as hate crimes, rather than mere hooliganism, and therefore warrant harsher sentences — as well as appearing as black marks on Russia’s public record.
July 2004
Paul Klebnikov (pictured, right), editor of the Russian edition Forbes magazine,
is shot and killed in Moscow. Forbes has reported that at the time of his death, Paul was believed to have been investigating a complex web of money laundering involving a Chechen reconstruction fund, reaching into the centers of power in the Kremlin and involving elements of organized crime and the FSB (the former KGB).
September 2004
Viktor Yushchenko, anti-Russian candidate for the presidency of the Ukraine, is poisoned by Dioxin. Yushchenko’s chief of staff Oleg Ribachuk suggests that the poison used was a mycotoxin called T-2, also known as "Yellow Rain," a Soviet-era substance which was reputedly used in Afghanistan as a chemical weapon. Miraculously, he survives the attack.
[Throughout the next year, a full frontal assault on the media is launched by the Kremlin. Reporters Without Borders states: "Working conditions for journalists continued to worsen alarmingly in 2005, with violence the most serious threat to press freedom. The independent press is shrinking because of crippling fines and politically-inspired distribution of government advertising. The authorities’ refusal to accredit foreign journalists showed the government’s intent to gain total control of news, especially about the war in Chechnya."]
September 2006
Andrei Kozlov (pictured, left), First Deputy Chairman of Russia’s Central Bank, who strove to stamp out money laundering (basically acting on analyses like that of reporter Klebnikov), the highest-ranking reformer in Russia, is shot and killed in Moscow. Many media reportHYPERLINK "http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=2436613&page=2"s classify Kozlov’s killing as "an impudent challenge to all Russian authorities" and warn that "failure to apprehend the killers would send a signal to others that intimidation of government officials is once again an option." Less considered is the possibility that Kozlov, like Klebnikov, was on the trail of corruption that would have led into the Kremlin itself, which then lashed out at him preemptively assuming he could not be bought.
October 2006
Anna Politkovskaya (pictured, right), author of countless books and articles
exposing Russian human rights violations in Chechnya and attacking Vladimir Putin as a dictator, is shot and killed at her home in Moscow. In her book Putin’s Russia, Politkovskaya had written: "I have wondered a great deal why I have so got it in for Putin. What is it that makes me dislike him so much as to feel moved to write a book about him? I am not one of his political opponents or rivals, just a woman living in Russia. Quite simply, I am a 45-year-old Muscovite who observed the Soviet Union at its most disgraceful in the 1970s and ’80s. I really don’t want to find myself back there again." Analysts begin to talk openly of Kremlin complicity in the ongoing string of attacks. Washington Post columnist Anne Applebaum writes: "Local businessmen had no motivation to kill her — but officials of the army, the police and even the Kremlin did. Whereas local thieves might have tried to cover their tracks, Politkovskaya’s assassin, like so many Russian assassins, did not seem to fear the law. There are jitters already: A few hours after news of Politkovskaya’s death became public, a worried friend sent me a link to an eerie Russian Web site that displays photographs of ‘enemies of the people’ — all Russian journalists and human rights activists, some quite well known. Above the pictures is each person’s birth date and a blank space where, it is implied, the dates of their deaths will soon be marked. That sort of thing will make many, and probably most, Russians think twice before criticizing the Kremlin about anything."
November 2006
Alexander Litvinenko (pictured, left), KGB defector and author of the book Blowing up Russia, which accuses the Kremlin of masterminding the and Pechatniki and Kashirskoye bombings in order to blame Chechen terrorists and whip up support for an invasion of Chechnya (which shortly followed), is fatally poisoned by radioactive Polonium obtained from Russian sources. Litivinenko had given sensational testimony to the Kovalev Commission and warned Sergei Yushenkov that was a KGB target). In his last days Litvinenko himself, as well as other KGB defectors, including Oleg Kalugin, Yuri Shvets and Mikhail Trepashkin (who allegedly actually warned Litvinenko that he had been targeted before the hit took place) directly blamed the Kremlin for ordering the poisoning. Recent press reports indicate that British investigators have come to the same conclusion. With Litvinenko out of the picture, the only member of the Kovalev Commission left unscathed is its 77-year-old namesake chairman, dissident Sergei Kovalev — who has grown notably silent
March 2007
On Sunday February 25th, the American TV news magazine Dateline NBC aired a report on the killing of Litvinenko. MSNBC also carried a report. The reports confirmed that British authorities believe Litvinenko perished in a "state-sponsored" assasination. In the opening of the broadcast, Dateline highlighted the analysis of a senior British reporter and a senior American expert on Russia who knew Litvinennko well. Here’s an excerpt from the MSNBC report:
Daniel McGrory, a senior correspondent for The Times of London, has reported many of the developments in the Litvinenko investigation. He said the police were stuck between a rock and a hard place. "While they claim, and the prime minister, Tony Blair, has claimed nothing will be allowed to get in the way of the police investigation, the reality is the police are perfectly aware of the diplomatic fallout of this story," McGrory said. "Let’s be frank about this: The United States needs a good relationship with Russia, and so does Europe," said Paul M. Joyal, a friend of Litvinenko’s with deep ties as a consultant in Russia and the former Soviet states. Noting that Russia controls a significant segment of the world gas market, Joyal said: "This is a very important country. But how can you have an important relationship with a country that could be involved in activities such as this? It’s a great dilemma." 

Five days before the broadcast aired, shortly after he was interviewed for it,
McGrory was dead. His obituary reads "found dead at his home on February 20, 2007, aged 54." Five days after the broadcast aired, Joyal (pictured, right) was lying in a hospital bed after having been shot for no apparent reason, ostensibly the victim of a crazed random street crime. He was returning home after having dinner with KGB defector Oleg Kalugin, and had been an aggressive advocate for Georgian independence from Russian influence. The attack remains unsolved.
CONCLUSION: Did the Kremlin have anything to do with either Joyal’s or McGrory’s fates, or is it just coincidence that both were struck down within days of giving statements directly blaming the Kremlin for Litvinenko’s killing to the American press? Would the Kremlin really be so brazen as to attack an American for speaking in America? Whether it did not not is almost beside the point: the thing you can’t see is always scarier than the thing you can. The Kremlin is now positioned to turn random accidents into weapons. Appelbaum sums it up: "As Russian (and Eastern European) history well demonstrates, it isn’t always necessary to kill millions of people to frighten all the others: A few choice assassinations, in the right time and place, usually suffice. Since the arrest of oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky in 2003, no other Russian oligarchs have attempted even to sound politically independent. After the assassination of Politkovskaya on Saturday, it’s hard to imagine many Russian journalists following in her footsteps to Grozny either."
NOTE: For more on the Putin murders from a panel of Russia experts, click here.
January 2009
On January 19, 2009, Russian human rights attorney Stanslav Markelov
(pictured, right) was shot in the back of the head with a silenced pistol as he left a press conference at which he announced his intention to sue the Russian government for its early release of the Col. Yuri Budanov, who murdered his 18-year-old client in Chechnya five years earlier. Also shot and killed was Anastasia Barburova, a young journalism student who was working for Novaya Gazeta and who had studied under Anna Politkovskaya, reporting on the Budanov proceedings.
July 2009
On July 14, 2009, leading Russian human rights journalist and activist Natalia Estemirova (pictured, left), a single mother of a teenaged daughter, was abducted in front of her home in Grozny, Chechnya, spirited across the border into Ingushetia, shot and dumped in a roadside gutter. Viewed as the successor to Anna Politkovskaya and by far the most prominent living critic of Chechen strongman Ramzan Kadyrov, who had repeatedly threatened her life, Estemirova was a member of the "Memorial" human rights NGO and a steadfast defender of human rights in Chechnya. Most recently, she had been reporting on the barbaric practice of the government in burning down the homes of rebel activists, often with women and children locked inside.
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Singing PM: 'Fats' Putin over the top of 'Blueberry Hill' with piano
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Also See:
Conflict Between Russia and Uraine!
03 March 2014
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