Saturday, April 04, 2015

If You Know What's Good For You ... (Part 20)

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Dr. Oz Fights Back Against Critics  
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Woman heals her bladder cancer with frankincense oil
Posted in: Health, Lifestyle, News by Antonia on 15 Jun, 2015
(TRFW News) When Jackie Hogan was diagnosed with a rare bladder cancer, she was informed by doctors that she’d eventually need to have her bladder removed, something that would necessitate her having to wear a drainage bag for the rest of her life.(1)
Woman heals her bladder cancer with frankincense oil
Not wanting to live in such a manner, she turned away from medical suggestions and decided to take matters in her own hands.
These days, Hogan couldn’t be happier; she has no signs of bladder cancer. (1)
How did she get better?
Very simply, she discovered the healing abilities of frankincense oil, which University of Oklahoma researchers have found, especially in conjunction with sandalwood oil, has properties that kill off cancer cells.(1,2) So effective is the frankincense oil that experts say, “Frankincense essential oil may represent a candidate on a growing list of natural compounds selectively eradicating cancer cells.” (2)
Hogan says she took four drops by mouth twice daily.
The many healing abilities of frankincense oil
Not only can frankincense oil help with bladder cancer, but it has been shown to have anti-cancer properties that help keep other cancers, including melanoma, prostate, and leukemia, at bay.(2) It’s also an excellent choice to boost mood, heal wounds and fight fungus, and has been enjoyed as an ancient traditional healing method in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.(2)
The list goes on: Frankincense oil has also been used to remedy bad breath, strengthen hair, and ease digestive problems.(3)
Why frankincense oil heals
Frankincense oil is effective because it contains monoterpenes, compounds which have the ability to help eradicate cancerous cells at the onset of their development, as well as their progression stages, making it ideal for those who discover their cancer regardless of when it’s found.(4)
Monoterpenes play a role in healing by following a series of events in the body, first stopping a cell’s replication process, then cell death, and ultimately, tumor regression.(4)
Sources for this article include:
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Why You May Be Better Off Ignoring Conventional Cholesterol and Low-Fat Diet Guidelines
By Dr. Mercola
April 27, 2015
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The idea that saturated fat is bad for your heart and should be avoided to prevent heart disease is misguided to say the least.
There’s no telling how many people have been harmed by this dangerous advice, as scientific evidence shows that a lack of healthy fat actually increases your cardiovascular health risks, but the number is likely significant.
Adding insult to injury, cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) have become the go-to "preventive medicine," despite ever-mounting evidence showing that these drugs can do far more harm than good as well.
Taken together, a low-fat diet and statins is a recipe for chronic health problems, and I cannot advise against falling into this trap strongly enough.
One in four Americans over the age of 45 currently take a statin drug, despite the fact that there are over 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to increased cancer risk—not to mention an increased risk for heart failure!
Questions have also been raised about statins’ potential to cause amnesia and/or dementia-like symptoms in some patients. According to Scientific American, hundreds of such cases have been registered with MedWatch, the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) adverse drug reaction database.

Statin Guidelines May Hurt Millions of Healthy People

In November 2013, the US updated its guidelines on cholesterol, focusing more on risk factors rather than cholesterol levels—a move estimated to double the number of Americans being prescribed these dangerous drugs.
According to the highly criticized new guideline, if you answer "yes" to ANY of the following four questions, your treatment protocol will call for a statin drug:
Do you have heart disease?
Do you have diabetes? (either type 1 or type 2)
Is your LDL cholesterol above 190?
Is your 10-year risk of a heart attack greater than 7.5 percent?
Your 10-year heart attack risk involves the use of a cardiovascular risk calculator, which researchers have warned may overestimate your risk by anywhere from 75 to 150 percent—effectively turning even very healthy people at low risk for heart problems into candidates for statins.
The guideline also does away with the previous recommendation to use the lowest drug dose possible. The new guideline basically focuses ALL the attention on statin-only treatment, and at higher dosages.
The UK followed suit in July 2014, recommending statins for otherwise healthy people with a 10 percent or greater 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As in the US, this was a dramatic change in recommendation, raising the number of Britons eligible for statins by about 4.5 million.
Pediatric Statin Guidelines Dramatically Increase Number of Teens on These Dangerous Drugs

Even teens and young adults are now being placed on statins. In 2011, the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) issued new guidelines for reducing heart disease in children and adolescents, recommending statin treatment if cholesterol levels are at a certain level.
Meanwhile, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) have far tighter restrictions on the use of statins in those under the age of 40.
According to a new study, if doctors follow the NHLBI’s guidelines, nearly half a million teens and young adults between the ages of 17-21 will be placed on statins. As reported by Medicinenet.com:
"Gooding's team found that 2.5 percent of those with elevated levels of ‘bad’ low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol would qualify for statin treatment under the NHLBI cholesterol guidelines for children, compared with only 0.4 percent under the ACC/AHA adult guidelines.
That means that 483,500 people in that age group would qualify for statin treatment under the NHLBI guidelines, compared with 78,200 under adult guidelines...
It's common for abnormal cholesterol levels and other heart disease risk factors to start appearing when people are teens, but the two sets of recommendations offer doctors conflicting advice, the researchers said.
For now, they recommend that physicians and patients ‘engage in shared decision making around the potential benefits, harms, and patient preferences for treatment...’"
Statin Drugs Can Wreck Your Health in Multiple Ways

Ironically, while statins are touted as "preventive medicine" to protect your heart health, these drugs can actually have detrimental effects on your heart, especially if you fail to supplement with CoQ10 (or better yet, ubiquinol, which is the reduced and more effective form of CoQ10).
For example, a study published in the journal Atherosclerosis showed that statin use is associated with a 52 percent increased prevalence and extent of calcified coronary plaque compared to non-users. And coronary artery calcification is the hallmark of potentially lethal heart disease.
Statins have also been shown to increase your risk of diabetes via a number of different mechanisms, so if you weren’t put on a statin because you have diabetes, you may end up with a diabetes diagnosis courtesy of the drug. Two of these mechanisms include:
Increasing insulin resistance, which contributes to chronic inflammation in your body, and inflammation is the hallmark of most diseases. In fact, increased insulin resistance can lead to heart disease, which, again, is the primary reason for taking a statin in the first place.
It can also promote belly fat, high blood pressure, heart attacks, chronic fatigue, thyroid disruption, and diseases like Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and cancer.
Raising your blood sugar. When you eat a meal that contains starches and sugar, some of the excess sugar goes to your liver, which then stores it away as cholesterol and triglycerides. Statins work by preventing your liver from making cholesterol. As a result, your liver returns the sugar to your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar levels.

Drug-induced diabetes and conventional lifestyle induced type 2 diabetes are not necessarily identical. If you're on a statin drug and find that your blood glucose is elevated, it's possible that what you have is just hyperglycemia—a side effect, and the result of your medication.Unfortunately, many doctors will at that point mistakenly diagnose you with "type 2 diabetes," and possibly prescribe yet another drug, when all you may need to do is simply discontinue the statin.
Statins also interfere with other biological functions. Of utmost importance, statins deplete your body of CoQ10, which accounts for many of its devastating results Therefore, if you take a statin, you must take supplemental CoQ10 or ubiquinol. Statins also interfere with the mevalonate pathway, which is the central pathway for the steroid management. Products of this pathway that are negatively affected by statins include:
All your sex hormones
Cortisone
The dolichols, which are involved in keeping the membranes inside your cells healthy
All sterols, including cholesterol and vitamin D (which is similar to cholesterol and is produced from cholesterol in your skin)
Refined Carbs—Not Fat—Are Responsible for Heart Disease

As noted by the Institute for Science in Society, Ancel Keys’ 1963 "Seven Countries Study" was instrumental in creating the saturated fat myth. He claimed to have found a correlation between total cholesterol concentration and heart disease, but in reality this was the result of cherry picking data.
When data from 16 excluded countries are added back in, the association between saturated fat consumption and mortality vanishes. In fact, the full data set suggests that those who eat the most saturated animal fat tend to have a lower incidence of heart disease:
"Nevertheless, people were advised to cut fat intake to 30 percent of total energy and saturated fat to 10 percent. Dietary fat is believed to have the greatest influence on cardiovascular risk through elevated concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. But the reduction in LDL cholesterol from reducing saturated fat intake appears to be specific to large, buoyant type A LDL particles, when it is the small dense type B particles – responsive to carbohydrate intake – that are implicated in cardiovascular disease." [Emphasis mine]

We've long acknowledged that the Western diet is associated with increased rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Yet the conventional paradigm is extremely reluctant to accept that it is the sugar content of this diet that is the primary culprit. When you eat more non-vegetable carbohydrates than your body can use, the excess is converted to fat by your liver. This process occurs to help your body maintain blood sugar control in the short-term, however it will likely increase triglyceride concentrations, which will increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.
Excessive consumption of refined grains and added sugars will also elevate your insulin and leptin levels and raise your risk of insulin/leptin resistance, which is at the heart of many chronic health problems. High insulin levels also suppresses two other important hormones -- glucagons and growth hormones -- that are responsible for burning fat and sugar and promoting muscle development, respectively.
So elevated insulin from excess carbohydrates promotes fat accumulation, and then dampens your body's ability to lose that fat. Excess weight and obesity not only lead to heart disease but also a wide variety of other diseases.So, while whole grains are allowed to make health claims saying they’re heart healthy, and low-fat foods are conventionally recognized as healthy for your heart, please remember that replacing saturated fats in your diet (like those from grass-fed beef, raw organic butter, and other high-quality animal foods) with carbohydrates (like breakfast cereal, bread, bagels, and pasta) will actually increase your risk of heart disease, not lower it.

Studies Show Saturated Fat Is Not Associated with Increased Heart Disease Risk, But Sugar Is

In one 2010 study, women who ate the most high glycemic foods had more than double the risk of developing heart disease as women who ate the fewest. Previous studies, including an excellent one published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, have also linked high-carb diets to heart disease. Contrary to popular belief, the scientific evidence also shows that saturated fat is in fact a necessary part of a heart healthy diet, and firmly debunks the myth that saturated fat promotes heart disease.
For example:
In a 1992 editorial published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, Dr. William Castelli, a former director of the Framingham Heart study, stated:
"In Framingham, Mass., the more saturated fat one ate, the more cholesterol one ate, the more calories one ate, the lower the person’s serum cholesterol. The opposite of what… Keys et al would predict… We found that the people who ate the most cholesterol, ate the most saturated fat, ate the most calories, weighed the least and were the most physically active."
A 2010 meta-analysis, which pooled data from 21 studies and included nearly 348,000 adults, found no difference in the risks of heart disease and stroke between people with the lowest and highest intakes of saturated fat.
Another 2010 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a reduction in saturated fat intake must be evaluated in the context of replacement by other macronutrients, such as carbohydrates. When you replace saturated fat with a higher carbohydrate intake, particularly refined carbohydrate, you exacerbate insulin resistance and obesity, increase triglycerides and small LDL particles, and reduce beneficial HDL cholesterol.The authors state that dietary efforts to improve your cardiovascular disease risk should primarily emphasize the limitation of refined carbohydrate intake, and weight reduction.
A 2014 meta-analysis of 76 studies by researchers at Cambridge University found no basis for guidelines that advise low saturated fat consumption to lower your cardiac risk, calling into question all of the standard nutritional guidelines related to heart health. According to the authors: "Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats."
Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Effectively Protect Your Heart Health

Contrary to what pharmaceutical PR firms will tell you, statins have nothing to do with reducing your heart disease risk. In fact, this class of drugs can actually increase your heart disease risk—especially if you do not take ubiquinol (CoQ10) along with it to mitigate the depletion of CoQ10 caused by the drug.Poor lifestyle choices are primarily to blame for increased heart disease risk, such as eating too much refined sugar and processed foods, getting too little exercise and movement, lack of sun exposure and rarely, or never grounding to the earth. These are all things that are within your control, and don’t cost much (if any) money to address.
It’s also worth noting that statins can effectively nullify the benefits of exercise, which in and of itself is important to bolster heart health and maintain healthy cholesterol levels. In fact, one of the best ways to condition your heart is to engage in high-intensity interval exercise. Taking a drug that counteracts your personal efforts to improve your health seems like a really questionable tactic. If you’re currently taking a statin drug and are worried about the excessive side effects they cause, please consult with a knowledgeable health care practitioner who can help you to optimize your heart health naturally, without the use of these dangerous drugs.

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11 Vegetables Anyone Can Grow on Their Own
By Dr. Mercola
April 20, 2015
One in three US households are now growing food, according to a special report from the National Gardening Association (NGA). This equates to about 42 million households with a food garden in 2013, a 17 percent increase from 2008.
Keeping a garden can improve your health by providing you with fresher, uncontaminated food, and cutting your grocery bill. NGA estimates that while the average US family spends $70 per year to plant a vegetable garden, they grow about $600 worth of produce – that’s a $530 return on your investment.
The promise of garden-fresh tomatoes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, and carrots is what initially draws many new gardeners in… but what keeps many involved is the intrinsically rewarding feeling of growing your own food.

11 Foods That Are Easy to Grow at Home
You might be surprised at how much food you can grow from just a few packets of seeds. Even if you’re new to gardening, many of the foods that follow are relatively foolproof options that will deliver a robust harvest, sometimes in as little as a few weeks from planting.
Keep in mind that even if you don’t have space in your backyard for a garden, you can grow vegetables in containers on your patio, balcony, or rooftop. Community gardens are also growing in popularity where you can rent a plot of soil to grow food for your family.

If this is your first garden, you might want to start out with just a few options from this list. You’ll probably need to experiment with different methods of planting, watering, building soil health, and controlling pests naturally, but as you gain confidence, and harvest the fruits of your labor, your garden (and your passion for gardening) will likely continue to grow.
If you’re not sure of which seeds to choose, check out my Heirloom Seed Kits for wonderful selections of vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowers that are non-hybrid, non-GMO, non-treated, and non-patented, in selections for both Northern and Southern climates.
1. Sprouts
Growing your own sprouts is quite easy, and you don't need a whole lot of space either; they can even be grown indoors. Sprouts may be small, but they are packed with nutrition, including vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and enzymes that help protect against free radical damage.
Two of my personal favorites are sunflower seed and pea shoots—both of which are typically about 30 times more nutritious than organic vegetables. They're also among the highest in protein. In addition, sunflower seeds contain healthy fats, essential fatty acids, and fiber—all of which are important for optimal health.
I used Ball jars when I first started sprouting seeds about 25 years ago, but I've since switched over to growing them in potting soil. With Ball jars you need to rinse them several times a day to prevent mold growth and it is a hassle to have them draining in the sink, taking up space.
Moreover, you need dozens of jars to produce the same amount of sprouts as just one flat tray. I didn't have the time or patience for that, and you may not either. The choice is yours though. You can easily grow sprouts and shoots with or without soil.
My Sprout Doctor Starter Kit comes with what I consider to be three of the best sprouts to grow – sunflower shoots, broccoli sprouts, and pea shoots. When grown in soil, you can harvest your sprouts in about a week, and a pound of seeds will probably produce over 10 pounds of sprouts.
Sunflower shoots will give you the most volume for your effort and, in my opinion, have the best taste. In one 10x10 tray, you can harvest between one and two pounds of sunflower sprouts, which will last you about three days. You can store them in the fridge for about a week. Broccoli sprouts look and taste similar to alfalfa sprouts, which most people like.
They're perfect for adding to salads, either in addition to or in lieu of salad greens, and sandwiches and are especially tasty in combination with fresh avocado. You can also add them to your vegetable juice or smoothies.
I've partnered with a company in a small town in Vermont that develops, breeds, and grows their own seeds, and is an industry leader in seed safety for sprouts and shoots.
All of my seeds are non-GMO, certified organic, and packed with nutrition. My starter kit makes it easy to grow your own sprouts in the comfort of your home, whenever you want. It provides everything you need, so all you have to do is grow and enjoy your sprouts.

2. Spinach and Loose-Leaf Lettuce
Early spring is a good time to plant spinach and other loose-leaf greens. The harvest is ready in just three to five weeks; simply cut off leaves here and there with scissors (don’t worry, they’ll grow back). Up to half of the nutrients in lettuce may be lost within two days of harvest, so growing your owns leads to a much more nutritious salad.

3. Kale
One cup of kale contains just around 30 calories but will provide you with seven times the daily recommended amount of vitamin K1, twice the amount of vitamin A and a day's worth of vitamin C, plus antioxidants, minerals, and much more.
This leafy green also has anti-inflammatory properties that may help prevent arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases – plant-based omega-3 fats for building cell membranes, cancer-fighting sulforaphane, and indole-3-carbinol, and an impressive number of beneficial flavonoids.
Kale grows all season long, but its flavor gets sweeter after a frost. Impressively, kale can survive temperatures as low as 10° Fahrenheit, so be sure to keep it growing into the fall and winter. Kale is ready to harvest about a month after planting.

4. Rainbow Chard
Chard belongs to the chenopod food family, along with beets and spinach. It’s an excellent source of vitamins C, E, and A (in the form of beta-carotene) along with the minerals manganese and zinc. It’s a hearty plant that grows easily, and it makes a striking addition to your garden with its bright red stems.
Plus, chard degrades quickly during shipping, making it ideal to grow at home. Plant chard in early spring, and you’ll be able to harvest it all season long.

5. Bok Choy
Bok choy, which is also referred to as Chinese white cabbage, contains vitamins C and K, plus a higher concentration of beta-carotene and vitamin A than any other variety of cabbage. It also contains important nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and manganese, all wrapped up in an extremely low-calorie package
Bok choy can be planted early spring through midsummer. Its leaves can be harvested when they’re about three inches tall, or you can wait until a head forms and harvest the whole plant at once.

6. Herbs
Fresh herbs can make your meals pop, but they’re expensive to purchase in the store. Fortunately, it takes very little space or skill to grow your own. You can even grow them on a windowsill. Some basic herbs to start with include basil, chives, cilantro, parsley, thyme, and dill.

7. Cherry Tomatoes
While regular tomatoes are relatively easy to grow, they can be sensitive to different temperatures. Cherry tomatoes are even easier, and you’ll be rewarded with pint after pint of the fruits that taste far superior to store-bought versions (plus they’ll be free of pesticides and fertilizers).
Cherry tomatoes like a sunny spot to grow, and you’ll need to tie them to a supportive stick or tomato cage as they grow.

8. Cucumbers
Cucumbers grow quickly and easily, and once you taste your homegrown version, you won’t want to go back to store-bought. These vines like to climb, so plant them near a trellis or fence, and put the seeds in only after the soil is warm.

9. Peas
Snap peas are another "vertical" grower, making them ideal when space is tight. Plant peas in early spring and plan to tie them to a small trellis for support when they start to get tall.

10. Carrots
Don’t let carrots intimidate you just because they grow below ground – they’re quite hearty and easy to grow for beginners. The seeds may take a few weeks to sprout and the carrots are usually ready to harvest in 46 to 65 days. As Matthew Benson, author of Growing Beautiful Food and farmer of Stonegate Farm in New York, told TIME:
 
"‘We know less about what’s going on under our feet than we do what goes on up in the cosmos,’ says Benson. ‘It’s so mysterious, all of these interesting relationships between roots and rhizomes and microbes and all these cellular chatter that goes on in the dirt.’ Pulling veggies from the soil can be very satisfying for a first time farmer."
11. Edible Flowers
Edible flowers like nasturtium add color to your garden and can add intense flavor to your meals. Plus, nasturtium is known to naturally repel pests like whiteflies, squash bugs, and striped pumpkin beetles. It takes about one to two weeks from planting for flowers to develop (simply snip the petals off for eating). These can even be grown indoors in pots.

How to Create Healthy Soil
The key to growing nutrient-dense food is to have soil that is abundant with microbial life and nutrients. Sadly, very few of us have access to this type of soil, but the good news is that it is relatively easy to create it. Paul Gautschi has been a personal inspiration to me in this area, and his garden is a testament to the fact that growing large amounts of healthy food can be very simple, and doesn’t require a lot of time.
The documentary Back to Eden was my first exposure to his work. I struggled for years seeking to unlock the puzzle of growing nutrient-dense food before I came across his recommendations—the simplicity and low cost of which really appealed to me. After studying his technique more carefully, I realized that using wood chips is probably the single best way to optimize soil microbiology with very little effort.
You can actually use virtually any organic material for mulch but wood chips seem to be one of the best, as they are concentrated sources of carbon that serve to feed the complex soil ecology. Typically, carbon is one of the nutrients that is far too low in the soil.
Additionally, by covering the soil around your plants and/or trees with mulch, you mimic what nature does naturally, and in so doing, you effortlessly maximize the health of the soil. Actually, the effortlessness comes after you do the hard work of moving the chips to where you need them to be. But once there, over time they work their magic and virtually eliminate the most concerning garden tasks, which is weeding, watering, and fertilizing.
Biochar is another great tool to help building your soil, the surface area of biochar is what gives it such great qualities when used in farming or gardening. The chips and leaves gradually break down and are digested and redigested by a wide variety of bacteria, fungi, and nematodes in the soil. Once the carbon can’t be digested anymore, it forms humates that last in the soil and provide a host of benefits that I will describe below.

Drastically Cut Down on Weeding and Watering
Other gardeners till the wood chips into the ground, which is by far your worst option. It’s actually important to avoid tilling the earth as it tends to destroy soil microbes, especially the complex and delicate mycorrhizal fungi. When you use wood chips as ground cover, tilling becomes completely unnecessary.
A few short months after putting down a deep layer of wood chips, you will end up with lush fertile soil beneath the chips that will happily support whatever you choose to grow. It is important to never plant in the actual chips, you need to move the chips back and plant in the soil and then cover the plant to below the first leaves.
One major reason why most people don’t want to garden is they abhor weeding. Wood chips will radically reduce your weeding, probably by over 90 percent, and the weeds that do grow are easily pulled out by their roots so it becomes relatively effortless to keep the area clean.
Many parts of the country are also challenged with droughts and may not get more than 10-20 inches of water a year. Wood chips are the ideal solution, as they will eliminate water evaporation from the soil. Better yet, at night they will grab moisture from the air and release it into the soil in the day when the soil needs it.

The Benefits of Gardening Go Far Beyond the Food
Gardening can provide you with a variety of fruits and vegetables to feed your family, but it also gets you outdoors in the fresh air and sunshine, helping your body produce much-needed vitamin D. It gets you moving, providing important exercise, and allows you to connect socially with other gardeners. It’s also good for your mental health.
A systematic review examined the impact of gardens and outdoor spaces on the mental and physical well-being of people with dementia. The research suggested that garden use, whether it be watering plants, walking through a garden, or sitting in one, lead to decreased levels of agitation or anxiety among the patients.
Researchers in the Netherlands have also found that gardening is one of the most potent stress-relieving activities there is. In their trial, two groups of people were asked to complete a stressful task; one group was then instructed to garden for half an hour while the other group was asked to read indoors for the same length of time.
Afterward, the gardening group reported a greater improvement in mood. Tests also revealed they had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol compared to those who tried to relax by quiet reading.
According to a survey by Gardeners’ World magazine, 80 percent of gardeners reported being "happy" and satisfied with their lives, compared to 67 percent of non-gardeners. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that gardeners are happier…
Mycobacterium vaccae is a type of bacteria commonly found in soil. Remarkably, this microbe has been found to "mirror the effect on neurons that drugs like Prozac provide." It helps to stimulate serotonin production, helping to make you feel happier and more relaxed. No wonder so many people describe their garden as their "happy place."
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Four Important Fat-Soluble Vitamins
By Dr. Mercola
April 20, 2015



Dietary fats are an important nutritional component not only because your body needs them for building healthy cells and producing hormones—fat is also required for the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins.

This includes vitamins A, D, E, and K, all of which perform a variety of important functions in your body. Vitamins A, D, and K cooperate synergistically, not only with each other but also with essential minerals like magnesium, calcium, and zinc.

This level of synergy is a reminder that your best bet is to cooperate with the wisdom of nature by eating a wide variety of nutrient-dense foods, and in the case of vitamin D, by getting appropriate sun exposure.
Optimizing your vitamin D levels could cut your risk for cancer in half. One study shows it may also slash your risk of heart attacks by 50% - and sunshine is free.
It can be rather tricky to fine-tune all the ratios of individual vitamins, minerals, and fats if you primarily rely on dietary supplements. That said, in some cases supplementation may be a wise choice, and I’ll review some of the basics to consider if you think you need more than your diet can provide you.

The Synergy Between Vitamins A, D, and K

Both vitamins A and D contribute to immune function by binding to their respective receptors, thereby directing cellular processes that promote healthy immune responses.

However, studies in isolated cells suggest that vitamin D may only be able to activate its receptor with the direct cooperation of vitamin A, and other studies have raised questions about vitamin A’s ability to negate vitamin D’s benefits if the ratio between them favors vitamin A too much...

One of the simplest ways to ensure an appropriate and beneficial ratio between these two vitamins is to make sure you’re getting your vitamin D from sensible sun exposure, and your vitamin A or beta-carotene from your diet, in the form of colorful vegetables.

The reason this works is it’s the retinoic acid (retinol) form of vitamin A that is problematic. Not beta carotene. Beta carotene is not a concern because it is PRE-vitamin A. Your body will simply not over-convert beta carotene to excessive levels of vitamin A.

Taking beta carotene supplements also will not interfere with your vitamin D, so that’s another option if for some reason you cannot get enough veggies in your diet. Chlorella is also loaded with natural beta carotene and can be very useful for optimizing your vitamin A levels. Vitamins A and D also cooperate to regulate the production of certain vitamin K-dependent proteins.

Once vitamin K2 activates these proteins, they help mineralize bones and teeth, protect arteries and other soft tissues from abnormal calcification, and protect against cell death. Magnesium, calcium, vitamin D3, or vitamin K2 also work in tandem, so if you’re considering taking one, you need to take all the others into consideration as well.


Study Predicts Vitamin A Supplements for Kids Could Save 600,000 Lives a Year
While vitamin D has received plenty of attention over the past decade, other vitamins, such as A, have receded into the background. But that doesn’t make them any less important.
Vitamin A is important for healthy vision, immune function, and proper cell growth, and according to previous research, preventing vitamin A deficiency in children could save an estimated 600,000 lives each year. As reported by Science Daily:
"[A] team of researchers... analyzed the results of 43 trials of vitamin A supplementation involving over 200,000 children aged 6 months to 5 years...
They found vitamin A supplements reduced child mortality by 24 percent in low and middle income countries. It may also reduce mortality and disability by preventing measles, diarrhea and vision problems, including night blindness.
The authors say that, if the risk of death for 190 million vitamin A deficient children were reduced by 24 percent, over 600,000 lives would be saved each year and 20 million disability-adjusted life years (a measure of quantity and quality of life) would be gained."
 
Vitamin D—One of the Simplest Solutions to Wide-Ranging Health Problems

Researchers have now realized that vitamin D is involved in the biochemical cellular machinery of all the cells and tissues in your body. When you are deficient, your entire body will end up struggling to operate optimally.
Unfortunately, vitamin D deficiency is still rampant around the world, even in sun-drenched areas, as many shun the sun for fear of skin cancer, or simply spend most of their daylight hours working indoors.
Research suggests that increasing levels of vitamin D3 among the general population could potentially prevent chronic diseases that claim nearly one million lives throughout the world each year. Incidence of several types of cancer and heart disease could also be slashed in half.
Vitamin D also helps fight infections of all kinds, including colds and the flu, as it regulates the expression of genes that influence your immune system to attack and destroy bacteria and viruses.
Optimizing your vitamin D levels should be at the top of the list for virtually everyone, regardless of your age, sex, color, or health status, as vitamin D deficiency has been linked to an astonishingly diverse array of common chronic diseases, including:


Cancer Hypertension Heart disease
Autism Obesity Rheumatoid arthritis
Diabetes 1 and 2 Multiple Sclerosis Crohn's disease
Cold & Flu Inflammatory Bowel Disease Tuberculosis
Septicemia Signs of aging Dementia
Eczema & Psoriasis Insomnia Hearing loss
Muscle pain Cavities Periodontal disease
Osteoporosis Macular degeneration Reduced C-section risk
Pre eclampsia Seizures Infertility
Asthma Cystic fibrosis Migraines
Depression Alzheimer's disease Schizophrenia


General Vitamin D Guidelines

To maximally benefit from vitamin D, you need a vitamin D level of at least 40 ng/ml, and to get there, you may need around 5,000-6,000 IUs of vitamin D3 per day or more, from all sources, and that includes appropriate sun exposure, food, and/or a vitamin D3 supplement. Research suggests the ideal range for optimal health is between 50-70 ng/ml, and if you have cancer or heart disease, the ideal may be even higher.
Ideally, test your vitamin D level at least twice a year to ensure you maintain a clinically relevant level year-round. Keep in mind that if you take a vitamin D supplement, you also increase your body’s need for vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 deficiency is actually what produces the symptoms of vitamin D toxicity, which includes inappropriate calcification that can lead to hardening of your arteries.


Both Vitamin D and A Need Magnesium and Zinc to Work Properly

Vitamins A and D carry out most of their functions by regulating gene expression, but to do this, they also need magnesium, both directly and indirectly. For starters, your cells can only produce vitamin A and D receptors with the assistance of magnesium. Even fully activated vitamin D (calcitriol) is useless in the absence of magnesium. Magnesium also helps digest the fat needed for their absorption.
As noted by Christopher Masterjohn in a previous article on my site, magnesium contributes to more than 300 chemical reactions, including every reaction that depends on ATP, the universal energy currency of your cells. It also activates the enzyme that makes copies of DNA, as well as the enzyme that makes RNA, which is responsible for translating the codes contained within your genes into the production of every protein within your body. This process of translating the DNA code in order to produce proteins is called "gene expression."
Unfortunately, industrial agriculture has massively depleted most soils of beneficial minerals like magnesium, so many are not getting sufficient amounts from their diet. An exception might be if you eat organic foods (grown in soil treated with mineral fertilizers), in which case you may still be able to get a lot of your magnesium from your food.
Seaweed and green leafy vegetables like spinach and Swiss chard are excellent sources of magnesium, as are some beans, nuts and seeds, like pumpkin, sunflower, and sesame seeds. Avocados also contain magnesium. Juicing your vegetables is a great way to ensure you're getting enough of them in your diet.
Zinc is another mineral that plays an important role in the function of fat-soluble vitamins. There are well-documented interactions between vitamin A and zinc. Vitamin A supports the intestinal absorption of zinc, and zinc, in turn, supports the formation of vesicles involved in transporting vitamin A and the other the fat-soluble vitamins across your intestinal wall. If you have low zinc, supplementing will support vitamin A’s role in eye health. Zinc also interacts with vitamin D, and it appears they promote each other’s intestinal absorption.

Vitamin E Is Important for Vision and Cancer Prevention
 
Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant and immune-system booster that—like vitamin D—has been shown to have a number of cancer-fighting properties. It may also be helpful in the treatment of obesity-related fatty liver disease and Alzheimer’s. Vitamin E is also important for eye health, and can help lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in the elderly.
"Vitamin E" actually refers to a family of at least eight fat-soluble antioxidant compounds and, ideally, vitamin E should be consumed in the broader family of mixed natural tocopherols and tocotrienols, (also referred to as full-spectrum vitamin E) to get the maximum benefits. Avoid synthetic vitamin E (tocopheryl), as it will not provide your body with the benefits that natural full-spectrum vitamin E will. According to Dr. Evan Shute, a physician who has worked with vitamin E for over three decades, healthy women need around 400 IUs of vitamin E per day, while men need around 600 IUs daily.
The best way to ensure you’re getting the full spectrum of vitamin E in a form your body can use is to make smart dietary choices. Tocopherol and its subgroups are found in certain nuts and green leafy vegetables, for instance. Sources of tocotrienols include palm oil, rice bran, and barley oils.
However, since there are relatively few healthy dietary sources of vitamin E, a natural supplement may be necessary for some. If you're interested in increasing your dietary sources of vitamin E, try eating more raw organic nuts, such as hazelnuts, almonds, walnuts, and pecans, legumes, and green vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli.

Vitamin K2 for Optimal Heart and Bone Health
Vitamin K1 is most well-known for the role it plays in blood clotting. In fact the "K" in "vitamin K" stands for "koagulation," the German word for blood clotting. From its discovery in the 1930s through the late 1970s, we knew of no other roles for vitamin K. Since researchers throughout the twentieth century saw the two forms of the vitamin as interchangeable, they ignored vitamin K2 as though its scarcity made it irrelevant.
The realization that vitamin K is not just for blood clotting, however, led us to discover that vitamins K1 and K2 are not interchangeable after all: vitamin K1 more effectively supports blood clotting, while vitamin K2 is also essential for building strong bones, preventing heart disease, and it plays a crucial part in other bodily processes as well. In fact, vitamin K2 is sometimes referred to as "the forgotten vitamin" because its major benefits are often overlooked.
Like vitamin A, vitamin K2 is an important adjunct to vitamin D, and if you are deficient in one, neither will work optimally. According to one of the worlds top vitamin K researchers, Dr. Cees Vermeer, most people are deficient in vitamin K. Most of you get enough K from your diet to maintain adequate blood clotting, but NOT enough to protect you from a variety of other health problems, such as:

Arterial calcification, cardiovascular disease, and varicose veins Dementia. Recent research suggests adding vitamin K-rich foods such as spinach, kale, collards, and mustard greens to your diet can slow cognitive decline. Seniors who ate one to two servings of leafy greens per day were found to have the cognitive ability of a person 11 years younger than those who consumed none
Osteoporosis Tooth decay
Prostate cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, and leukemia Infectious diseases such as pneumonia
 
There are three types of vitamin K:
Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone), found naturally in plants, especially green vegetables; K1 goes directly to your liver and helps you maintain healthy blood clotting
Vitamin K2 (menaquinone), made by the bacteria that line your gastrointestinal tract; K2 goes straight to your blood vessel walls, bones, and tissues other than your liver. The biological role of vitamin K2 is to help move calcium into the proper areas in your body, such as your bones and teeth. It also helps remove calcium from areas where it shouldn’t be, such as in your arteries and soft tissues
Vitamin K3 (menadione) is a synthetic form I do not recommend; it's important to note that toxicity has occurred in infants injected with synthetic vitamin K3

 

Vitamin K2, which is made in your body and also produced by bacteria in fermented foods, and is a superior form of vitamin K2. It’s the one I recommend for supplementation, as it’s natural and non-toxic, even at 500 times the recommended daily allowance (RDA). Increasing your K2 by consuming more fermented foods is the most desirable way to increase your levels. The food highest in natural K2 is natto, which is a form of fermented soybeans.
You can obtain all of the vitamin K2 you need (about 200 micrograms) by eating 15 grams of natto daily, which is half an ounce. By using a specially formulated starter culture you can also dramatically boost the vitamin K2 content of your homemade fermented vegetables.

Fat-Soluble Vitamins Need Healthy Fats to Work

Obviously, in order for your body to actually absorb all of these fat-soluble vitamins (and other fat-soluble nutrients) you need to eat them with some fat. Dietary fats are also needed for the conversion of carotene to vitamin A, for mineral absorption, and for a host of other biological processes. A simple way to boost absorption of these vitamins is to drizzle some olive oil over your salad, or eat your veggies with some raw organic butter.
Coconut oil is another excellent choice, and has been found to improve absorption of antioxidants and other nutrients better than other fats. Coconut oil earns even more "points" because it's rich in lauric acid, which converts in your body to monolaurin – a compound also found in breast milk that strengthens immunity. When choosing a coconut oil, make sure you choose an organic coconut oil that is unrefined, unbleached, made without heat processing or chemicals, and does not contain genetically engineered ingredients.
Avoid processed vegetable oils such as corn, soy, safflower, sunflower, and canola. Corn and soy is typically genetically engineered and tend to be contaminated with glyphosate, which has recently been classified as a probable carcinogen. They also have a skewed ratio of omega fatty acids, being high in damaged omega-6s and low in healthy omega-3s.
In addition to that, vegetable oils in general are unstable, and when heated, they degrade into highly inflammatory oxidation products. More than 100 dangerous oxidation products have been found in a single piece of chicken fried in vegetable oils.

The following tips can help ensure you're eating the right fats for your health: Use organic butter (preferably made from raw milk) instead of margarines and vegetable oil spreads. Butter is a healthy whole food that has received an unwarranted bad rap.
Use coconut oil for cooking. It is far superior to any other cooking oil and is loaded with health benefits. (Remember that olive oil should be used COLD, drizzled over salad or fish, for example, not to cook with.)
Following my nutrition plan will automatically reduce your modified fat intake, as it will teach you to focus on healthy whole foods instead of processed junk food.
To round out your healthy fat intake, be sure to eat raw fats, such as those from avocados, raw dairy products, and olive oil, and also take a high-quality source of animal-based omega-3 fat, such as krill oil.
What Are GMOs?

From April 19th through April 25th we launch GMO Awareness Week. We set aside an entire week dedicated to providing you with information on GMOs and labeling initiatives.
GMOs are a product of genetic engineering, meaning their genetic makeup has been altered to induce a variety of "unique" traits to crops, such as making them drought-resistant or giving them "more nutrients." GMO proponents claim that genetic engineering is "safe and beneficial," and that it advances the agricultural industry. They also say that GMOs help ensure the global food supply and sustainability. But is there any truth to these claims? I believe not. For years, I've stated the belief that GMOs pose one of the greatest threats to life on the planet. Genetic engineering is NOT the safe and beneficial technology that it is touted to be.

Help Support GMO Labeling

The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA)—Monsanto’s Evil Twin—is pulling out all the stops to keep you in the dark about what’s in your food. For nearly two decades, Monsanto and corporate agribusiness have exercised near-dictatorial control over American agriculture. For example, Monsanto has made many claims that glyphosate in Roundup is harmless to animals and humans. However, recently the World Health Organization (WHO) had their research team test glyphosate and have labeled it a probable carcinogen.
Public opinion around the biotech industry's contamination of our food supply and destruction of our environment has reached the tipping point. We're fighting back. That's why I was the first to push for GMO labeling. I donated a significant sum to the first ballot initiative in California in 2012, which inspired others to donate to the campaign as well. We technically "lost the vote, but we are winning the war, as these labeling initiatives have raised a considerable amount of public awareness.
The insanity has gone far enough, which is why I encourage you to boycott every single product owned by members of the GMA, including natural and organic brands. More than 80 percent of our support comes from individual consumers like you, who understand that real change comes from the grassroots.
Thankfully, we have organizations like the Organic Consumers Association (OCA) to fight back against these junk food manufacturers, pesticide producers, and corporate giants.

Internet Resources Where You Can Learn More

Non-GMO Shopping Guide
GMA Boycott List
GMA Traitor Brands

Together, Let's Help OCA Get The Funding They Deserve

Let’s Help OCA get the funding it deserves. I have found very few organizations who are as effective and efficient as OCA. It’s a public interest organization dedicated to promoting health justice and sustainability. A central focus of the OCA is building a healthy, equitable, and sustainable system of food production and consumption. That's why I'm proud to announce I will be matching donations up to $250,000 this week.
Please make a donation to help OCA fight for GMO labeling.


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Here's the Minimum Amount of Exercise You Really Need
Dr. Mercola
03 April 2015
http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2015/04/03/recommended-amount-exercise.aspx?e_cid=20150403Z1_DNL_B_art_2&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20150403Z1_DNL_B&et_cid=DM73340&et_rid=901125262
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Eighty percent of Americans fail to meet the recommended amount of exercise, which is 2.5 hours of moderate-intensity activity or 1.25 hours of vigorous-intensity activity each week… along with twice weekly strength-training workouts.1
These are the “official” US government exercise recommendations, but they are not the last word on fitness. How much exercise you need depends on a number of factors, not the least of which is the type of activity you do. The more intense you work out, the less frequently you should do it (and the shorter the duration should be).
It’s entirely possible to get a phenomenal workout in just 20 minutes two or three times a week if you’re using, for instance, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) or super-slow weight training. But this doesn’t mean you should simply sit around for the rest of the week.
Regular walking (upwards of 7,000 steps a day) is also important, in addition to regular exercise. But before I get into the details, here’s something you should know: even small amounts of exercise matter… and any amount of exercise is better than none at all.

The Minimal Amount of Exercise You Should Strive For…

The greatest health gains among exercisers are often seen when a person goes from not exercising at all to getting physically active. And it doesn’t take much to see significant benefits. Compared to women who don’t exercise at all, for instance, women who exercise just a few times a week have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and blood clots.2
For moderate-exercise activities, which included walking, gardening, and housework, the health benefits peaked at four to six sessions per week. For more strenuous exercise (defined as exercise that caused sweating and a fast heartbeat), the benefits peaked at just two to three times per week.
Those who engaged in the more strenuous exercise two to three times a week lowered their risk of heart disease, stroke, and blood clots by 20 percent. Interestingly, less is more in this case, as women who exercised strenuously more than three times per week had increased vascular risk.3
It’s quite clear that if you engage in intense exercise, overdoing it can cause serious problems, which is often seen in marathon runners. According to a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2010 in Montreal, regular exercise reduces cardiovascular risk by a factor of two or three, but the extended vigorous exercise performed during a marathon raises your cardiac risk seven-fold!

Even Minimal Amounts of Exercise May Improve Your Health

Exercise is not “all or nothing” when it comes to your health. If you don’t fit in three workouts one week, but do just one instead, you’ll still benefit – albeit not quite as much as if you had done more. According to researcher Philipe de Souto Barreto from the University Hospital of Toulouse:4,5
“Getting inactive people to do a little bit of physical activity, even if they don’t meet the recommendations, might provide greater population health gains… Achieving target physical activity recommendations should remain as a goal but not the core public health message surrounding physical activity.”
For instance, just one hour of moderate activity a week may lower your risk of premature death by 15 percent, while just 20 minutes of vigorous intensity once a week may lower it by 23 percent.6 Research also suggests that walking for one to 74 minutes a week may lower your risk of premature death by 19 percent compared to those who are sedentary.7
So if you’re feeling intimidated about starting an exercise program, feeling you simply don’t have enough time… if you can carve out 20 minutes a week, you can experience some health benefits of exercise.
That being said, there is a dose-response relationship between physical activity and premature death as well as at least seven chronic diseases (cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon cancer, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis).8
In other words, the more exercise you do, the greater the benefits will be. This is true only to a point, because once you get past a certain threshold then more exercise will only cause harm.
Most people are not at risk of over-exercising… but, as mentioned, the general guideline to remember is the more intense you exercise, the more recovery time you will need. One of the many positive aspects of intense exercise is that you can “max out” your exercise requirements in a very short (and very achievable) amount of time.

The Benefits of Shorter, More Intense Workouts

When you exercise intensely, you can reap greater rewards in a shorter period of time. For starters, high-intensity interval training burns more calories in less time – a mere 2.5 minutes, divided into five 30-second sprint intervals at maximum exertion, each followed by four minutes of light pedaling to recuperate, can burn as much as 220 calories.9
Besides burning more calories, HIIT has also been shown to produce greater health benefits overall than conventional aerobic training, such as increasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance – both of which are critical components of optimal health.
One study that found doing just three minutes of high-intensity exercise per week for four weeks could lead to a 24 percent improvement in insulin sensitivity.
Another important benefit of high-intensity interval training is its ability to naturally increase your body's production of human growth hormone (HGH), also known as "the fitness hormone."
HGH is a synergistic, foundational biochemical underpinning that promotes muscle and effectively burns excessive fat. A study published in the journal Cell Metabolism even showed that when healthy but inactive people exercise intensely, even if the exercise is brief, it produces an immediate change in their DNA.10
While the underlying genetic code in the muscle remains unchanged, exercise causes important structural and chemical changes to the DNA molecules within your muscles. This contraction-induced gene activation appears to be early events leading to the genetic reprogramming of muscle for strength, and to the structural and metabolic benefits of exercise.
Several of the genes affected by an acute bout of intense exercise are genes involved in fat metabolism. Specifically, the study suggests that when you exercise, your body almost immediately experiences genetic activation that increases the production of fat-busting proteins HIIT also plays an important part in promoting overall health and longevity. This too is something you cannot get from conventional, aerobic endurance training. Other benefits associated with high-intensity interval training include:

Decrease in body fat Improved muscle tone
Improved athletic speed and performance Ability to achieve your fitness goals much faster
Increase in energy and sexual desire Firmer skin and reduces wrinkles

The HIIT approach I personally use and recommend is the Peak Fitness method, which consists of 30 seconds of maximum effort followed by 90 seconds of recuperation, for a total of eight repetitions. Super Slow strength training is another high-intensity exercise, which may even be more effective than Peak Fitness cardio. While they both are highly effective, you can generate a higher cardiac output with Super Slow training as discussed in my interview with Dr. McGuff.
By slowing your movements down, you're actually turning them into high intensity exercise. The super-slow movement allows your muscle, at the microscopic level, to access the maximum number of cross-bridges between the protein filaments that produce movement in the muscle. You can perform the super-slow technique with hand weights, resistance machines, bodyweight exercises, or resistance bands.
You only need about 12 to 15 minutes of super-slow strength training once a week to achieve the same HGH production as you would from 20 minutes of Peak Fitness sprints, which is why fitness experts like Dr. Doug McGuff are such avid proponents of this technique. The key to making this work for you is intensity, which needs to be high enough that you reach muscle fatigue. If you've selected the appropriate weight for your strength and fitness level, your goal is to have enough weight that you cannot do more than 12 reps, but not so much that you can't complete at least four. Ideally, you will be somewhere in the neighborhood of seven to eight.
When the intensity is this high, you can decrease the frequency of your strength training sessions. In fact, the higher your fitness level, the less often you should do them. I also recommend incorporating Buteyko breathing, which involves breathing only through your nose while working out. This raises the challenge to another level. As a guideline, when you start out, allow your body at least two days to rest, recover, and repair between high-intensity sessions, and do not exercise the same muscle groups each time.
As your strength and endurance increases, decrease how often you do the sessions, as each one is placing greater stress on your body (provided you keep pushing yourself to the max). As a rule, avoid doing high-intensity exercises more than twice or three times a week. You can enjoy other activities on the off-days, such as swimming, Pilates, yoga, biking, gardening, or whatever other activities tickle your fancy. I also encourage you to use a pedometer and walk as much as possible, ideally 7,000 to 15,000 steps daily.

Not Exercising May Be Worse Than Smoking

If you’re looking for motivation to get moving, consider this: research shows that inactivity is lined to more than 5 million deaths each year, which is similar to the death toll taken by smoking.11 Data also suggests that at least twice as many deaths occur due to a lack of exercise than due to obesity. This is really astounding, considering one in five US deaths are associated with obesity. Study author Ulf Ekelund from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge told TIME:12
“This is a simple message: just a small amount of physical activity each day could have substantial health benefits for people who are physically inactive.”
As stated by Dr. Timothy Church, director of preventive medicine research at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, exercise indeed affects your entire body—from head to toe—in beneficial ways.13 This includes changes in your:
  • Muscles, which use glucose and ATP for contraction and movement. Tiny tears in your muscles make them grow bigger and stronger as they heal. Gaining more muscle through resistance exercises has many benefits, from losing excess fat to maintaining healthy bone mass and preventing age-related muscle loss as you age. The intensity of your resistance training can achieve a number of beneficial changes on the molecular, enzymatic, hormonal, and chemical level in your body.
  • Lungs. As your muscles call for more oxygen, your breathing rate increases. The higher your VO2 max—your maximum capacity of oxygen use—the fitter you are.
  • Heart. Your heart rate increases with physical activity to supply more oxygenated blood to your muscles. The fitter you are, the more efficiently your heart can do this, allowing you to work out longer and harder. Your blood pressure will also decrease as a result of new blood vessels forming.
  • Brain. The increased blood flow also benefits your brain, allowing it to almost immediately function better. Exercising regularly also promotes the growth of new brain cells, boosting your capacity for memory and learning. A number of neurotransmitters are also triggered, such as endorphins, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, and GABA. Some of these are well-known for their role in mood control. Exercise, in fact, is one of the most effective prevention and treatment strategies for depression.
  • Joints and Bones. Exercise can place as much as five or six times more than your body weight on them. Weight-bearing exercise is one of the most effective remedies against osteoporosis, as your bones are very porous and soft, and as you get older your bones can easily become less dense and hence, more brittle -- especially if you are inactive.
The simple take-home message is this: if you are currently living a sedentary lifestyle, the mere act of incorporating some high-intensity activity two or three days a week, along with regular walking, can significantly reduce your mortality rate.
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Eat organic or use apple cider vinegar soak to remove pesticides 
by Lynn Griffith on 31 Mar, 2015
(TRFW News) In the long standing debate of organic versus non-organic fruits and vegetables, new research may give organic produce an edge. A study conducted by Harvard University is the first to show the benefits of eating organic fruits and vegetable to protect reproductive health. (1)

Avoiding pesticide residue may improve reproductive health

Pesticide residue has been shown to lower men’s sperm count and alter sperm formation. The study showed that men who ate the highest amounts of non-organic fruits and vegetables also had 49 percent lower sperm count and only 32 percent normally formed sperm. (1)
Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston (USA), Jorge Chavarro, said: "These findings should not discourage the consumption of fruit and vegetables in general. In fact, we found that total intake of fruit and vegetables was completely unrelated to semen quality. This suggests that implementing strategies specifically targeted at avoiding pesticide residues, such as consuming organically-grown produce or avoiding produce known to have large amounts of residues, may be the way to go." (1)
The study recommends considering shopping for produce with the understanding that not all fruits and vegetables are high in pesticide residue. Fruits and vegetables that the study recognized as low in residue included: peas, beans, grapefruit, and onions. Those that were recognized as high in residue include peppers, spinach, strawberries, apples, and pears. (1)
Other fruits and vegetables that are considered to have low pesticide exposure include: asparagus, avocados, broccoli, bananas, cauliflower, sweet corn, kiwi, onions, mangoes, papayas, and pineapple. (2)

Fruit flies fed organic produce experienced improved fertility, more resistance to oxidative stress and improved life span

A 2013 study investigated the impact of organic and conventional produce on the health of fruit flies. The study showed fruit flies that ate organic produce lived longer than flies fed conventional foods. It was also shown that the organic fed flies had higher egg production. Flies that ate organic were also able to live longer when food was not available. It appears that organic foods improved fertility, provided more resistance to oxidative stress, and helped the flies live longer. (3)

If on a budget, wash your fruits and vegetables with apple cider vinegar and water to remove pesticide residue

If you are on a budget and cannot afford organic food, try stocking up on apple cider vinegar. Place one tablespoon of vinegar in one cup of water and pour over fruit and vegetables. Stir periodically for five minutes and drain and rinse very well. The water left behind from the fruits and vegetable will most likely be very dirty and will show you how much residue you avoided eating by doing a simple 5-minute soak. (4)
If you want to be healthy, live longer, improve fertility, and resist stress, it appears that eating organic or removing as much pesticide residue as possible from your diet may greatly improve your health.

Sources for this article include:

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Also See:
If You Know What's Good For You ...
(Part 1)
19 February 2009
and
(Part 2)
01 August 2009
and
(Part 3)
02 March 2010
and
(Part 4)
28 September 2010
and
(Part 5)
15 March 2011
and
(Part 6)
20 July 2011
and
(Part 7)
09 October 2011
and
(Part 8)
12 December 2011
and
(Part 9)
09 March 2012
and
(Part 10)
12 July 2012
and
(Part 11)
30 October 2012
and
(Part 12)
11 February 2013
and
(Part 13)
11 May 2013
and
(Part 14)
01 August 2013
and
(Part 15)
14 December 2013
and
(Part 16)
13 February 2014
and
(Part 17)
14 April 2014
and
(Part 18)
16 June 2014
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.ca/2014/06/if-you-know-whats-good-for-you-part-18.html
and
(Part 19)
28 August 2014
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.ca/2014/08/your-health-is-result-of-symbiotic.html
and
Vitamins, Genetic Food, Health
03 April 2007
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2007/04/vitamins-genetic-food-health.html
and
FDA - Drugs, Vaccines & Vitamin Supplements
(Part 1)
07 July 2008
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2008/07/marching-towards-police-state.html
and
How Safe Is Our Food?
(Part 1)
06 December 2008
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2008/12/food-how-safe-is-it.html
and
(Part 2)
26 March 2009
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-safe-is-our-food-part-2.html
and
Losing Weight - Are Diets Detrimental to Health?
16 September 2010
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2010/09/too-much-too-young-teen-body-obsession.html
and
No More Fluoride in the Water - Waterloo, Ontario
08 November 2010
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2010/11/no-more-floride-in-water-waterloo.html
and
No More Fluoride in the Water - Portland, Oregon
05 June 2013
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.ca/2013/06/major-victory-as-portland-oregon-votes.html
and
Why is Fluoride in Our Water?
09 January 2011
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2011/01/why-is-fluoride-in-our-water.html
and
Medication Errors are a Major Killer!
(Part 1)
04 February 2011
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2011/02/medication-errors-are-major-killer.html
and
Can't Sleep? There is Help!
08 February 2011
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2011/02/cant-sleep-there-is-help.html
and
Avoid Chemotherapy and Radiation!
19 November 2011
http://arcticcompass.blogspot.com/2011/11/chemotherapy-and-radiation.html