Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Trump's Picks'

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James Mattis Secretary of Defense , Full Speech Today 1/25/17 at Martin Luther King
Published on Jan 25, 2017
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Breaking News , President Donald Trump keeps James Comey as FBI director
Published on Jan 24, 2017
^ Make Americ a Great Again. Thank You ^
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The Untruth About Jeff Sessions | U.S. Attorney General
Published on Jan 22, 2017
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On November 18th, 2016, Sen. Jeff Sessions was announced as President Donald Trump’s nominee for United States Attorney General and the mainstream media smear campaign began almost immediately. What is the Truth About Jeff Sessions?
Sources:
http://www.fdrurl.com/untruth-about-j...
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Attorney General Nominee Takes A Beating On Capitol Hill
Published on Jan 11, 2017
Jeff Sessions (R-Al) is before the senate judiciary committee today, seeking confirmation as Attorney General. A series of liberal articles have been written about Sessions, painting him as "racist."
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Why Jeff Sessions as our next attorney general should reassure, not alarm, all Americans
Published January 22, 2017
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Sen. Sessions promises to enforce the law if confirmed
Published on Jan 10, 2017
The President-elect Trump's attorney general nominee spent the confirmation hearing explaining his views and defending allegations of racism he says are false; Mike Emanuel explains for 'Special Report'.
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“There was one moment in Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing,” writes Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick, “that revealed why so many are so terrified of him.”  Lithwick deemed this moment so inflammatory that she called it “reprehensible” and “gobsmacking.”  Somewhat more restrained, Politico’s Seung Min Kim and Josh Gerstein said it was “head-scratching.”
What was this extraordinary occurrence? 
Had Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general of the United States embraced the notion of a terrorist state like, say, Iran having nukes? Was he in favor of packing the electorate with illegal immigrants and thus changing the electoral landscape forever? Had he admitted to using a private server for thousands of classified documents? Perhaps he voiced his support for abortion-on-demand, thereby adding to the more than 50 million children that have been terminated since Roe v. Wade?
Of course, not. Senate Democrats and their media allies see none of these things as “reprehensible” (as they certainly are).  No, the “gobsmacking” moment was when Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island asked Sessions:
“A secular person has just as good a claim to understanding the truth as a religious person, correct?”
Sessions, transparent in his beliefs, replied doubtfully: “Well, I’m not sure.”
This moment, preserved in C-Span amber for all eternity, was, according to Lithwick, one that demonstrates “why Democrats are rightly very, very afraid.”
Afraid? Let’s examine this exchange for a moment and the historically valid and entirely rational reason for the Alabama senator’s skepticism. 
In 2011, I published my first book "The Grace Effect." The book is chiefly the powerful story of our remarkable adopted daughter, Sasha, who was abandoned at birth and, until the age of eleven, was raised in Ukrainian orphanages where children suffered material, intellectual, and spiritual deprivation in the extreme. I give the reader a glimpse of that world through Sasha’s eyes and experiences, exploring a larger question:
How are we to account for the fact that in some parts of the world there is a higher regard for human life, dignity, freedom, property, and the Rule of Law than in others?
Is it education? Wealth? ObamaCare?
None of the above. 
“The defects of human society are the defects of human nature,” wrote "Lord of the Flies" author William Golding. 
Indeed. A given philosophy, creed, or religion will either restrain our darker impulses or exacerbate them, but escape them we cannot.
These days there is a lot of talk about religion—Christianity in particular—and its role in public life. Whether it is protesting nativities, the push to remove “In God We Trust” from our currency, or prayer in public schools, Christianity in America is under siege.
The secular elites argue that the religion is a bit like smoking: It is harmful, but if you must do it, do it in the designated areas only.
Apparently, a senate confirmation hearing is no place to light-up.
But Senator Sessions read my book shortly after its publication and liked it very much. He knows Sasha’s story. He knows that she suffered at the hands of a godless bureaucracy that did not regard people as beings made in the image of God and therefore of intrinsic value, but instead believed them to be an accident in space and time and just so much raw material for the construction of the superstate.  Indeed, the only absolute was the state itself.
As a student of history, no doubt Senator Sessions also knows that secular regimes, lacking any belief in laws beyond those they manufacture, alter, and violate at will, were responsible for the deaths of no less than 100 million people in the Twentieth Century alone.
That’s more than all religious wars from all previous centuries combined
That is because atheism unquestionably exacerbates the evil in our nature. And if Christianity doesn’t make you good—strictly speaking, from a theological perspective, none of us are—it makes you better than you might otherwise be.
I am reminded of novelist Evelyn Waugh’s famous quip, made in response to someone drawing attention to his all-too-obvious faults: “Without supernatural aid, I would hardly be a human being.”
All of this is at the heart of the Senator’s remarks: If one does not believe in a Lawgiver, how can we be sure he will acknowledge any law at all? The point isn’t that the secularly-minded cannot be morally outstanding people; the point is that there is no logically compelling reason to be anything other than entirely selfish.
I mean, if there is no God to judge you in the next life for your actions in this one, why not do preciously as you want to do? 
Americans should be comforted by the knowledge that the man who might become the highest law enforcement officer in the country believes that some laws are absolute and inviolable no matter what the cultural zeitgeist of the moment is; because sometimes the zeitgeist says slavery is OK and Jews should go to concentration camps.
In his farewell address in September of 1796, Washington offered this warning:
“And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”
Washington was not simply playing to the masses by tossing them this morsel of religious rhetoric. He was referring to a dangerous European experiment, the French Revolution, which sought the destruction of the Church and institutionalized atheism. The experiment was a failure. What followed was regicide, civil war, and the Reign of Terror.
The Cultural Left’s romance with secularism is naïve at best, malicious at worst. History demonstrates where that worldview all too often leads.
The moral and intellectual sensibilities of the West are still running off of the accumulated capital of a rich Judeo-Christian heritage. 
But watch out. When the fumes in that tank are spent, tyranny cannot be far away. 
As T.S. Eliot rightly observed, “If Christianity goes, the whole culture goes.”
Larry Alex Taunton is the author of The Faith of Christopher Hitchens: The Restless Soul of the World’s Most Notorious Atheist (2016) and the Executive Director of the Fixed Point Foundation. You can follow him at larryalextaunton.com or on Twitter @LarryTaunton.
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10 things to know about Sen. Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump’s pick for attorney general
January 10, 2017
Trump's Transition: Who is Jeff Sessions?
President-elect Donald Trump announced Friday that he plans to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) as attorney general. (Thomas Johnson/The Washington Pos10 things to know about Sen. Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump’s pick for attorney general By Amber Phillips January 10, 2017 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/11/18/10-things-to-know-about-sen-jeff-sessions-donald-trumps-pick-for-attorney-general/?utm_term=.84e94aec4904 Trump's Transition: Who is Jeff Sessions? President-elect Donald Trump announced Friday that he plans to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) as attorney general. President-elect Donald Trump announced Friday that he plans to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) as attorney general. (Thomas Johnson/The Washington Post) This post originally appeared on The Fix in mid-November when President-elect Donald Trump named Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as his pick for Attorney General. With Sessions confirmation hearing set for Tuesday, we're re-publishing it. In Donald Trump's world, most roads, it seems, lead back to Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), President-elect Trump's pick for attorney general. After Sessions became one of the first members of Congress to endorse Trump this February, he became an adviser on almost every major decision and policy proposal Trump made during the campaign: — A top Sessions aide helped Trump communicate his immigration policy. — Sessions chaired Trump national security advisory committee. — Sessions advised Trump on who to choose for vice president. (Sessions was also in the running himself for the No. 2 job.) “The president-elect has been unbelievably impressed with Senator Sessions and his phenomenal record as Alabama’s attorney general and U.S. attorney,” a Trump transition statement released Thursday read. “It is no wonder the people of Alabama re-elected him without opposition.” Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) talks with reporters as he arrives at Trump Tower Monday. (Evan Vucci/AP) In a relatively short time, Sessions has elevated himself from backbencher to a “arguably one of the top five power players in the country now,” said Alabama GOP consultant Brent Buchanan. Here's crash course in a politician likely to be a pivotal figure in Trump's administration: The basics: Sessions has served as a senator from Alabama for two decades. But Alabama is such a loyal state to its top lawmakers that Sessions is actually the junior senator from the state; Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R) has been in office three decades. [Here are the people whose names have been floated for Trump’s Cabinet] Sessions is popular back home: Aside from his first election in 1996, Sessions has never won with less than 59 percent of the vote. In 2014, he ran unopposed. His full name is: Jefferson Beauregard “Jeff” Sessions III. He's “amnesty's worst enemy”: The conservative National Review crowned Sessions with that title in 2014, with good reason. Sessions has opposed nearly every immigration bill that has come before the Senate the past two decades that has included a path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally. He's also fought legal immigration, including guest worker programs for immigrants in the country illegally and visa programs for foreign workers in science, math and high-tech. In 2007, Sessions got a bill passed essentially banning for 10 years federal contractors who hire illegal immigrants. “Legal immigration is the primary source of low-wage immigration into the United States,” Sessions argued in a 2015 Washington Post op-ed. " . . . What we need now is immigration moderation: slowing the pace of new arrivals so that wages can rise, welfare rolls can shrink and the forces of assimilation can knit us all more closely together.” Sessions endorses Trump in February (John Bazemore/AP) He's a debt hawk and a military hawk: Sessions, a lawyer before he became a politician, is known for touring Alabama with charts warning of the United States' “crippling” debt. On foreign policy, Sessions has advocated a get-tough approach, once voting against an amendment banning “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment” of prisoners. These are two positions that could put him at odd with the president he'll serve: Trump has expensive plans that involve significant spending, like $1 trillion on an infrastructure program — and he campaigned on a strong noninterventionist worldview (often claiming, inaccurately, that he opposed the Iraq War before it started). He's a climate change skeptic: Here's Sessions in a 2015 hearing questioning Environmental Protection Agency's Gina McCarthy: “Carbon pollution is CO2, and that’s really not a pollutant; that’s a plant food, and it doesn’t harm anybody except that it might include temperature increases.” Accusations of racism have dogged Sessions's career: Actually, they almost derailed it. In 1986, a Senate committee denied Sessions, then a 39-year-old U.S. attorney in Alabama, a federal judgeship. His former colleagues testified Sessions used the n-word and joked about the Ku Klux Klan, saying he thought they were “okay, until he learned that they smoked marijuana.” By the time the testimony was finished, Sessions's “reputation was in tatters,” wrote Isaac Stanley-Becker in The Post this July, on the eve of Sessions delivering a prime-time speech at the Republican National Convention for Trump. In 1986, Sessions defended himself against accusations of racism. “I am not the Jeff Sessions my detractors have tried to create,” he told the very same Senate Judiciary Committee he now sits on. “I am not a racist. I am not insensitive to blacks.” And he told Stanley-Becker this summer: “Racism is totally unacceptable in America. Everybody needs to be treated fairly and objectively.” But the Southern Poverty Law Center's Heidi Beirich, who tracks hate speech, said Sessions is guilty of it, and that his mere presence in Trump's inner circle is “a tragedy for American politics.” He's got a populist streak: Here's one area where he and Trump likely get along swell. Wall Street and corporate executives are often the antagonists in the Alabama senator's speeches. “A small group of CEOs don't get to set immigration policy for the country,” he said in a 2014 speech opposing a multibillion-dollar bill to help control the stem of influx of Central American refugees on the border. As hard-line as Sessions can be, he's worked with Democrats before: “Say what you will about him,” former longtime Senate Democratic communications aide Jim Manley told the Almanac of American Politics. “He was always nice to [the late Ted] Kennedy and other Democrats as well.” Even people who have run against him have nice things to say about him. Stanley-Becker talked to Susan Parker, a Democrat who tried to unseat Sessions in 2002. During a debate, she asked for a tissue and Sessions handed her one. She joked she would use it to dry her eyes when Sessions made her cry, and he responded: “Please don’t say that. That’s my nightmare. I promise I’ll be nice.” Sessions has joined with Democrats to support criminal justice reform legislation like reducing the disparity between sentence time for crack and powder cocaine (although civil rights advocates say more recently he opposed a bipartisan criminal justice reform package that in part reduced federal sentences.) In 2010, he teamed up with Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) on a proposal to put strict limits on nonmilitary federal spending. It fell one vote short of passing. Sen. Jeff Sessions endorses Donald Trump Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's White House bid during a joint appearance in his home state. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's White House bid during a joint appearance in his home state. (Reuters) In 2016, he's gone from fringe to mainstream: Aside from immigration battles, Sessions mostly operated in the background on Capitol Hill. Until 2016. His mix of hard-line immigration position and a populist streak had made him a tea party star and thus a coveted endorsement catch for Republican presidential candidates catering to the tea party. In presidential primary debates, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) would even brag about his ties to Sessions. In the end, Sessions chose Trump, surprising the political establishment by jumping on stage with him at a rally in February in Madison, Ala., two days before Super Tuesday and donning a “Make America Great Again” hat. “I told Donald Trump this isn't a campaign, this is a movement,” Sessions said at the time. Nine months later, Sessions will be a central figure in transitioning that “movement” into a working government.
President-elect Donald Trump announced Friday that he plans to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) as attorney general. President-elect Donald Trump announced Friday that he plans to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) as attorney general. (Thomas Johnson/The Washington Post)
This post originally appeared on The Fix in mid-November when President-elect Donald Trump named Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions as his pick for Attorney General. With Sessions confirmation hearing set for Tuesday, we're re-publishing it.
In Donald Trump's world, most roads, it seems, lead back to Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), President-elect Trump's pick for attorney general.
After Sessions became one of the first members of Congress to endorse Trump this February, he became an adviser on almost every major decision and policy proposal Trump made during the campaign:
— A top Sessions aide helped Trump communicate his immigration policy.
— Sessions chaired Trump national security advisory committee.
— Sessions advised Trump on who to choose for vice president. (Sessions was also in the running himself for the No. 2 job.)
“The president-elect has been unbelievably impressed with Senator Sessions and his phenomenal record as Alabama’s attorney general and U.S. attorney,” a Trump transition statement released Thursday read. “It is no wonder the people of Alabama re-elected him without opposition.”
Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) talks with reporters as he arrives at Trump Tower Monday. (Evan Vucci/AP)
In a relatively short time, Sessions has elevated himself from backbencher to a “arguably one of the top five power players in the country now,” said Alabama GOP consultant Brent Buchanan. Here's crash course in a politician likely to be a pivotal figure in Trump's administration:
The basics: Sessions has served as a senator from Alabama for two decades. But Alabama is such a loyal state to its top lawmakers that Sessions is actually the junior senator from the state; Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R) has been in office three decades.
Sessions is popular back home: Aside from his first election in 1996, Sessions has never won with less than 59 percent of the vote. In 2014, he ran unopposed.
His full name is: Jefferson Beauregard “Jeff” Sessions III.
He's “amnesty's worst enemy”: The conservative National Review crowned Sessions with that title in 2014, with good reason. Sessions has opposed nearly every immigration bill that has come before the Senate the past two decades that has included a path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally.
He's also fought legal immigration, including guest worker programs for immigrants in the country illegally and visa programs for foreign workers in science, math and high-tech. In 2007, Sessions got a bill passed essentially banning for 10 years federal contractors who hire illegal immigrants.
“Legal immigration is the primary source of low-wage immigration into the United States,” Sessions argued in a 2015 Washington Post op-ed. " . . . What we need now is immigration moderation: slowing the pace of new arrivals so that wages can rise, welfare rolls can shrink and the forces of assimilation can knit us all more closely together.”

Sessions endorses Trump in February (John Bazemore/AP)
He's a debt hawk and a military hawk: Sessions, a lawyer before he became a politician, is known for touring Alabama with charts warning of the United States' “crippling” debt. On foreign policy, Sessions has advocated a get-tough approach, once voting against an amendment banning “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment” of prisoners.
These are two positions that could put him at odd with the president he'll serve: Trump has expensive plans that involve significant spending, like $1 trillion on an infrastructure program — and he campaigned on a strong noninterventionist worldview (often claiming, inaccurately, that he opposed the Iraq War before it started).
He's a climate change skeptic: Here's Sessions in a 2015 hearing questioning Environmental Protection Agency's Gina McCarthy: “Carbon pollution is CO2, and that’s really not a pollutant; that’s a plant food, and it doesn’t harm anybody except that it might include temperature increases.”
Accusations of racism have dogged Sessions's career: Actually, they almost derailed it. In 1986, a Senate committee denied Sessions, then a 39-year-old U.S. attorney in Alabama, a federal judgeship. His former colleagues testified Sessions used the n-word and joked about the Ku Klux Klan, saying he thought they were “okay, until he learned that they smoked marijuana.”
By the time the testimony was finished, Sessions's “reputation was in tatters,” wrote Isaac Stanley-Becker in The Post this July, on the eve of Sessions delivering a prime-time speech at the Republican National Convention for Trump.
In 1986, Sessions defended himself against accusations of racism. “I am not the Jeff Sessions my detractors have tried to create,” he told the very same Senate Judiciary Committee he now sits on. “I am not a racist. I am not insensitive to blacks.”
And he told Stanley-Becker this summer: “Racism is totally unacceptable in America. Everybody needs to be treated fairly and objectively.”
But the Southern Poverty Law Center's Heidi Beirich, who tracks hate speech, said Sessions is guilty of it, and that his mere presence in Trump's inner circle is “a tragedy for American politics.”
He's got a populist streak: Here's one area where he and Trump likely get along swell. Wall Street and corporate executives are often the antagonists in the Alabama senator's speeches. “A small group of CEOs don't get to set immigration policy for the country,” he said in a 2014 speech opposing a multibillion-dollar bill to help control the stem of influx of Central American refugees on the border.
As hard-line as Sessions can be, he's worked with Democrats before: “Say what you will about him,” former longtime Senate Democratic communications aide Jim Manley told the Almanac of American Politics. “He was always nice to [the late Ted] Kennedy and other Democrats as well.”
Even people who have run against him have nice things to say about him. Stanley-Becker talked to Susan Parker, a Democrat who tried to unseat Sessions in 2002. During a debate, she asked for a tissue and Sessions handed her one. She joked she would use it to dry her eyes when Sessions made her cry, and he responded: “Please don’t say that. That’s my nightmare. I promise I’ll be nice.”
Sessions has joined with Democrats to support criminal justice reform legislation like reducing the disparity between sentence time for crack and powder cocaine (although civil rights advocates say more recently he opposed a bipartisan criminal justice reform package that in part reduced federal sentences.) In 2010, he teamed up with Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) on a proposal to put strict limits on nonmilitary federal spending. It fell one vote short of passing.
Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's White House bid during a joint appearance in his homeSen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) endorsed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's White House bid during a joint appearance in his home state.
In 2016, he's gone from fringe to mainstream: Aside from immigration battles, Sessions mostly operated in the background on Capitol Hill. Until 2016. His mix of hard-line immigration position and a populist streak had made him a tea party star and thus a coveted endorsement catch for Republican presidential candidates catering to the tea party. In presidential primary debates, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) would even brag about his ties to Sessions.
In the end, Sessions chose Trump, surprising the political establishment by jumping on stage with him at a rally in February in Madison, Ala., two days before Super Tuesday and donning a “Make America Great Again” hat.
“I told Donald Trump this isn't a campaign, this is a movement,” Sessions said at the time.
Nine months later, Sessions will be a central figure in transitioning that “movement” into a working government.
Amber Phillips writes about politics for The Fix. She was previously the one-woman D.C. bureau for the Las Vegas Sun and has reported from Boston and Taiwan. Follow @byamberphillips
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