Sunday, August 27, 2017

Is There Corruption in Politics (A Spiritual War) Going On?

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Steve Quayle – America in Spiritual War Between Good and Evil
Published on Aug 26, 2017
On the mainstream media propaganda, 25 year Radio veteran and filmmaker, Steve Quayle says, “I can’t believe that people cannot see beyond the BS, but you’re fed it in the news by the vomit brokers. I want to make this clear that you are considered by the mainstream media (MSM) to be stupid. You are considered basically zombies. So, all they are (MSM) are channeling you to their position. They will bring you to the point that you will say it’s better for everybody if I just die of starvation, or it’s good for the world if 90% of the world’s population is destroyed. When you have the richest people in the world believing that, believe me, you have got a problem. This is a spiritual war, and Lucifer is the ultimate rebel. . . . Even Hollywood has become more outspoken with its love affair with Lucifer and his plan to rule the world. So, we are seeing every single day the vilification that is a traditional moral, or anything that has to do with our borders, culture, our heritage, our monuments, our statues and everything, everything is being defaced. That’s what the Romans did. When one Roman conqueror came in, he wanted to obliterate the other ones. Same thing with the pharaohs in Egypt. . . . This is exactly what they are doing to our nation. . . . This is a spiritual war. What do they hate about Donald Trump? I’ll tell you. You see the President of the United States, a very powerful man, brilliant man, and he is surrounded, but his head is bowed as people pray for him. He knows that God put him in there against all odds. That’s God’s odds. There is a Bible verse that says the whole world be gathered against thee. The whole world has been, if you will, summoned to battle that man. Is he a King Cyrus or a Nebuchadnezzar? One destroyed the Jews, and one released the Jews. Cyrus was given a command by the living God to free the Jews and allow them to go back and build. They hate Trump because he believes in God and he is acknowledging him. Remember this, in the new age, you can be your own god. Donald Trump bows his head to God. The most important thing people can say is Mr. President I am praying for you. Prayer changes history. . . . This is a spiritual battle.”
Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Steve Quayle of SteveQuayle.com.
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Lucifer Has Long Had His Hands in Politics
Since the earliest days of Christianity, people have accused their political rivals of being in league with the Devil
By Danny Lewis
smithsonian.com
July 20, 2016
Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson made waves during the second night of the Republican National Convention, when he insinuated that presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton was in league with Lucifer. 
Carson’s claims were shocking to some, but he's far from the first politician to make such an insinuation about an opponent.
As it turns out, there is actually a long-standing tradition of accusing political rivals to be in league with the Devil. Just a few months ago, former Speaker of the House John Boehner facetiously referred to fellow Republican Senator Ted Cruz as “Lucifer in the flesh,” and the 2013 History Channel miniseries “The Bible” drew controversy after some claimed an actor portraying Satan was made up to look like President Barack Obama. But while these incidents are fairly recent, over the centuries, people frequently claimed they saw the Devil’s hands at work in politics. Here are a few notable times Lucifer and his allies worked their way into politics and government:
Rome and the Book of Revelation
A cartoon from the magazine The Judge, where "Democracy" is portrayed as the devil overlooking Washington, D.C., and looks very much like Grover Cleveland. (Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons)
Some of the longest-lasting images associated with the Devil and politics comes from the Bible itself, particularly the Book of Revelation. While this portion of the New Testament is focused on the Apocalypse and how Satan’s forces would clash with God’s armies, many Biblical scholars believe some of the demonic figures are allegories for pagan Rome, which persecuted early Christians. As L. Michael White, a classics professor at the University of Texas-Austin, writes for PBS Frontline, the Book of Revelation is peppered with references to Rome, including the seven-headed “beast from the sea,” which is thought to be a direct reference to the Roman Emperor and the famous seven hills of Rome.
Dante’s "Inferno"
The first part of Dante Alighieri's epic poem, “The Divine Comedy,” tracks the author’s allegorical descent through the nine levels of Hell. The poem was written as an allegory for the journey that the soul takes on the path towards God, and throughout "Inferno," he sets aside time to call out specific people and their punishments in Hell. Many of these figures were real-life politicians whom Dante had dealings with, and in some ways the poem reflects Dante’s own years of wandering after he was exiled from his native Florence by his rivals, Columbia University historian Akash Kumar writes. While Dante depicts his enemies as imprisoned for a variety of sins throughout Hell, he saves Pope Boniface VIII, who supported his exile, a special place alongside other infamously ambitious Popes and political leaders.
The Salem Witch Trials
From 1692 to 1963, the residents of Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony earned themselves a spot in history for their infamous witch trials. "More than 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft—the Devil's magic—and 20 were executed," writes 
Jess Blumberg for Smithsonian Magazine. While scholars have puzzled for years over what caused this outbreak of mass hysteria, one theory is that an extended period of cold weather lead to a series of bad harvests and economic downturn for the agrarian community. As the local economy plummeted and people struggled to feed themselves and their families, some may have turned a resentful eye towards more prosperous neighbors and merchants, sparking the literal witch hunts for allies of Satan.
Daniel Defoe and the Devil
Best known as the author of Robinson Crusoe, 18th-century novelist and satirist Daniel Defoe was also a devout Protestant Dissenter who believed that the Devil had a physical form and walked the Earth. That led him to write one of his later books, The Political History of the Devil. In the 1762 tome, Defoe claims that Lucifer manipulates world events and politics both in his own form and by possessing the minds and bodies of his allies and servants, according to the British Library. In particular, Defoe saw the Catholic Church and the Pope as allegiant to the Devil, whom he also blamed for the Crusades.
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Corruption, USA
by David Rosen
March 11, 2016
The game is rigged — you know it, I know it and so does a growing number of Americans know it. A recent Gallup poll found that in 2014 three in four Americans (75%) acknowledged corruption was widespread throughout the U.S. government. More revealing, it noted that over the last decade this perception increased; in 2007 and 2009, it was at two in three Americans, 67 percent and 66 percent, respectively. The belief that the game is rigged is a core assumption in the 2016 presidential election.
Last August, in one of the early Republican presidential debates, Donald Trump acknowledged the underlying truth of American politics. “Most of the people on this stage I’ve given to, just so you understand, a lot of money … I give to everybody. When they call, I give” he admitted. “And do you know what? When I need something from them two years later, three years later, I call them, they are there for me. And that’s a broken system.”
While the other candidates looked at their shoes, pretending that Trump was talking about the weather, Rand Paul admitted that the game was rigged. “This is what’s wrong. Trump bribes all of us. He even bribes Hillary Clinton,” he intoned. And then ranted, “That’s what he does, he bribes us.” Bernie Sanders endlessly assails Hillary Clinton for accepting big money from Goldman Sachs and other big-money supporters.
In the wake of the death of Supreme Court Judge Antonin Scalia, renewed attention has focused on the Court’s 2010 Citizens United decision legalizing the doctrine that “money is speech.” Trump and Sanders openly acknowledge that big money influences — controls? – the political system; Clintons hems-&-haws, protecting her secret backers. Far more threatening, the Koch brothers organized a nearly $900 million war chest to finance the campaigns of rightwing politicians. Remarkable, while this 1%-ers strategy significantly influenced local and state politics throughout the country, Obama won in 2008 and 2012 and, this year, Trump and Sanders continue to gain popular support.
Sadly, the corruption of politics — admitted to by Trump and Paul, legitimized by the Court and assailed by Sanders and Clinton — is but the tip of a social phenomenon of corruption deforming American society. Political pay-to-play corruption is but one face of the deepening culture of corruption that has become an endemic feature of an American society, a society increasingly controlled of the 1%-ers.
Not a week goes by without a media exposé of yet another corruption scandal involving a politician, corporate executive, revolving-door opportunist or a local landlord or businessman. America’s culture of corruption seems to penetrate all nearly aspects of economic relations. The following are four spheres of corruption that point to the deeper crisis besetting the U.S. economy, politics and society.
Corruption as daily life
Nothing exemplifies the deepening corruption facing the nation than the water crisis devastating Flint, MI. The sad, sad story of what’s happening to the people of this de-industrialized heartland city has been extensively reported. It’s a postmodern version of the Zika virus now ravaging Brazil and much of the southern hemisphere.
The Flint tale is a crime in three acts. The first involves the sufferings of the people of Flint — mostly African-American and other poor people — that appears like a retelling of a Charles Dickens’ tale of the horrors of early capitalism. The second involves the utter corruption – and incompetence – of official political-governmental system, most notably the state’s Republican governor, Rick Synder; efforts are underway seeking his impeachment. And the third act involves who wins?, who profits? Flint is a postmodern tragedy in which the three crimes are being played out simultaneously.
The U.S. economy is a form of state capitalism, with the state attempting to balance the public good, citizens’ needs, with the interests of the private gain, capitalist profit. It does this by facilitating the redistribution of taxes, public and corporate. In the Flint crisis, there’s been two “winners,” the state of Michigan and private interests, like Nestlé, the Swiss conglomerate. And there’s been one “loser,” the citizens of Flint.
The Michigan government took control of the city’s operations and installed a manager to impose financial discipline. It initially claimed that by cutting the cost of the city’s water services, it had “saved” millions; short-term decisions are now having long-term political, financial and painfully human consequences at a price yet to be determined.
Private corporations are a second winner. Amy Goodman, on a February 17th Democracy Now program, linked the Flint crisis to the profits of Nestlé’s water bottling operations in Mecosta County, MI, located only two hours from Flint. Through heavy-duty lobbying and lawsuits, the company weakened water protection rules and cut a no-cost deal for the rights to Lake Michigan water. Its Ice Mountain brand of bottled water is being sold worldwide and, as Goodman reports, distributed to the Flint residents by both federal and state agents – and likely at a nice profitable for the company.
Private greed turns the public infrastructure into a terrain of short-term plunder for questionable politicians and opportunities corporations.
Corruption as political life
Political corruption is endemic to the U.S. system of government, operating at the federal, state and local levels. This is the corruption that Trump and others rail against – and it is as old as the nation itself. One early scandal involved Samuel Swartwout, Pres. Andrew Jackson appointee as the Collector of Customs for the Port of New York in 1829, who reportedly embezzled over $1 million in customs receipts and fled to Europe to avoid prosecution.
In 2013, CREW — Citizen’s for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington –identified 17 members of Congress on its list of notable scamsters, 13 who engaged in serious misconduct and four whose transgressions, it insists, “brought them a dishonorable mention.”
Pay-to-play politics is a bi-partisan game that operates at all levels of government and, occasionally, some of those with the dirtiest hands are exposed. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) awaits trial for alleged corruption while, in 2015, Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-PA) and four associates were charged with bribery and misusing hundreds of thousands of dollars of federal, charitable and campaign funds.
At the state level, the arrest and conviction of two of New York’s top politicians, Sheldon Silver (Dem., assembly speaker) and Dean Skelos (Rep., Senate majority leader), illustrates how extensive corruption is; after his conviction, Skelos receives an annual pension of $96,000. A recent study by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) found that between 1976 and 2013 the three top states in terms of public corruption convictions were New York (2,657), California (2,549 and Illinois (1,982).
Corruption as economic life
Capitalism is a roller-coaster economic system distinguished by flush periods of exuberance as well as periodic crisis, sometimes reaching the level of the Great Depression of the 1930s and the recent Great Recession. Recent crises are epitomized by the corruption scandals of Enron in 2001 and Bernard Madoff in 2008.
Gretchen Morgenson, a New York Times business columnist, reflected on the 2008 mortgage crisis: “The giant accounting frauds that took down companies in the early 2000s, the corrupt brokerage firm research [i.e., Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s] that harmed so many investors, the Libor [London Interbank Offered Rate] rate-fixing scandal that cast doubt on the basis for trillions of dollars of fixed income instruments.” The big banks paid tax-deductible fines or got a slap-on-the-wrist; no major financier faced criminal prosecution.
Morgenson identified a number of factors precipitating the 2008 financial crisis, including: excessive pay for short-term performance; poor regulatory oversight; and the absence of sufficient consequences for misdeeds. “This failure to prosecute high-level officials involved in the financial crisis has been the topic of much consternation over the past three or four years — and rightly so,” she stated. “But the key actors in the mess for the most part walked away from the wreckage unscathed. A perverse set of incentives like this does nothing to discourage bad behavior.”
The deepening culture of corruption is leading Americans to lose faith not only in government but corporations as well. According to a recent AP-NORC survey, “Confidence in Institutions,” people are deeply suspicious of financial institutions and major companies. “Americans’ confidence in banks and financial institutions has declined by half over the past 40 years,” it reports. Confidence in major companies was highest in 1984 (31%) but, by 2010, had sunk to 13 percent; confidence in banks was highest in 1977 (42%) but by 2014 had fallen to 15 percent with a “great deal” of confidence, 53 percent with “some confidence” and 32 percent with “hardly any” confidence.
Corruption as corporate murder
The American landscape is littered with the bodies of dead, disabled and diseased people who’ve paid the gravest prices for ongoing corporate corruption.
Pick your poison for no industry is exempt from environmental corruption, no matter whether Apple or Exxon or Peabody Coal. Repeated exposés about the auto industry are indicative of the deepening culture of corporate malfeasants becoming the industry’s new normal. Last year, General Motors (GM) recalled about 800,000 small cars due to faulty ignition switches, which could shut off the engine during driving; 121 deaths and some 4,000 claims were due to this failure. Volkswagen “Dieselgate” scandal involving software that cheated on emissions tests and about 11 million cars worldwide; so far, some 60 deaths are attributed to it in the U.S.
Revelations that Exxon Mobil and Peabody Coal, among other fossil fuel companies, deliberately mislead the public about climate change is becoming a legal – and political – issue. Attorney Generals in New York and California are taking up the issue, questions if such practices involved investor fraud among other crimes.
No industrial sector is immune for charges of corruption, whether the Hollywood movie industry and the all-white Oscars; the pharmaceutical industry relating to fraudulent clinic trials or pay-offs to doctors; and the for-profit private prison racquet at the federal and state levels. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. Even Fortune magazine has an annual list of the biggest corporate corruption scandals.
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The U.S. is adrift in a new Gilded Age. The term “Gilded Age” is attributed to Mark Twain who, in 1873, co-authored a novel entitled The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today. Scornfully, Twain did not call his tale “the golden age,” thus referring to a precious metal, one of beauty and value. Rather, he invoked the notion of something cheap, shoddy, “gilded” to look expensive but actually with a phony gold-like coating.
It was an era of the Robber Barons, unscrupulous land speculators, shady corporate practices and scandal-plagued politics, symbolized by New York’s notorious Tammany Hall political machine and William M. “Boss” Tweed. Equally troubling, it was an era of the vulgar display of gaudy wealth. It was also a period of the Progressives, of the 8-hr workday movement, of the regulations of meatpacking and sweatshops, and women securing the vote. Sound familiar
Marx, acknowledging Hegel, once wrote, “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.” We’ve entered an era of tragic farce, an era in which a growing proportion of the Americans know the game is rigged, that government and corporations are — individually and colluding together – corrupt institutions. One can only wonder if there will be any change as a result of the upcoming election.
More articles by: DAVID ROSEN

David Rosen is the author of Sex, Sin & Subversion:  The Transformation of 1950s New York’s Forbidden into America’s New Normal (Skyhorse, 2015).  He can be reached at drosennyc@verizon.net; check out 
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“Yes, We’re Corrupt”: A List of Politicians Admitting That Money Controls Politics
Jon Schwarz
July 30 2015
One of the most embarrassing aspects of U.S. politics is politicians who deny that money has any impact on what they do. For instance, Tom Corbett, Pennsylvania’s notoriously fracking-friendly former governor, got $1.7 million from oil and gas companies but 
assured voters that “The contributions don’t affect my decisions.” If you’re trying to get people to vote for you, you can’t tell them that what they want doesn’t matter.
This pose is also popular with a certain prominent breed of pundits, who love to tell us “Don’t Follow the Money” (New York Times columnist David Brooks), or “Money does not buy elections” (Freakonomics co-author Stephen Dubner on public radio’s Marketplace), or “Money won’t buy you votes” (Yale Law School professor Peter H. Schuck in the Los Angeles Times).
Meanwhile, 85 percent of Americans say we need to either “completely rebuild” or make “fundamental changes” to the campaign finance system. Just 13 percent think “only minor changes are necessary,” less than the 18 percent of Americans who 
believe they’ve been in the presence of a ghost.
So we’ve decided that it would be useful to collect examples of actual politicians acknowledging the glaringly obvious reality. Here’s a start; I’m sure there must be many others, so if you have suggestions, please leave them in the comments or 
email me. I’d also love to speak directly to current or former politicians who have an opinion about it.
• “I gave to many people, before this, before two months ago, I was a businessman. I give to everybody. When they call, I give. And do you know what? When I need something from them two years later, three years later, I call them, they are there for me. And that’s a broken system.” — Donald Trump in 2015.
• “[T]his is what’s wrong. [Donald Trump] buys and sells politicians of all stripes … he’s used to buying politicians.” — Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., in 2015.
“Now [the United States is] just an oligarchy, with unlimited political bribery being the essence of getting the nominations for president or to elect the president. And the same thing applies to governors and U.S. senators and congress members. … So now we’ve just seen a complete subversion of our political system as a payoff to major contributors …” — Jimmy Carter, former president, in 2015. (Thanks to Sam Sacks.)
• “[T]he millionaire class and the billionaire class increasingly own the political process, and they own the politicians that go to them for money. … we are moving very, very quickly from a democratic society, one person, one vote, to an oligarchic form of society, where billionaires would be determining who the elected officials of this country are.” — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in 2015. (Thanks to Robert Wilson in comments below.) Sanders has also said many similar things, such as “I think many people have the mistaken impression that Congress regulates Wall Street. … The real truth is that Wall Street regulates the Congress.” (Thanks to ND, via email.)
• “You have to go where the money is. Now where the money is, there’s almost always implicitly some string attached. … It’s awful hard to take a whole lot of money from a group you know has a particular position then you conclude they’re wrong [and] vote no.” — Vice President Joe Biden in 2015.
• “[T]oday’s whole political game, run by an absurdist’s nightmare of moneyed elites, is ridiculous – a game in which corporations are people and money is magically empowered to speak; candidates trek to the corporate suites and secret retreats of the rich, shamelessly selling their political souls.” – Jim Hightower, former Democratic agricultural commissioner of Texas, 2015. (Thanks to CS, via email.)
• “People tell me all the time that our politics in Washington are broken and that multimillionaires, billionaires and big corporations are calling all the shots … it’s hard not to agree.” — Russ Feingold, three-term Democratic senator from Wisconsin, in 2015 announcing he’s running for the Senate again. (Thanks to CS, via email.)
“Lobbyists and career politicians today make up what I call the Washington Cartel. … [They] on a daily basis are conspiring against the American people. … [C]areer politicians’ ears and wallets are open to the highest bidder.” — Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in 2015.
• “I can legally accept gifts from lobbyists unlimited in number and in value … As you might guess, what results is a corruption of the institution of Missouri government, a corruption driven by big money in politics.” — Missouri State Sen. Rob Schaaf, 2015. (Thanks to DK, via email.)
• “When you start to connect the actual access to money, and the access involves law enforcement officials, you have clearly crossed a line. What is going on is shocking, terrible.” – James E. Tierney, former attorney general of Maine, in 2014.
• “Allowing people and corporate interest groups and others to spend an unlimited amount of unidentified money has enabled certain individuals to swing any and all elections, whether they are congressional, federal, local, state … Unfortunately and rarely are these people having goals which are in line with those of the general public. History well shows that there is a very selfish game that’s going on and that our government has largely been put up for sale.” – 
John Dingell, 29-term Democratic congressman from Michigan, in 2014 just before he retired.
• “When some think tank comes up with the legislation and tells you not to fool with it, why are you even a legislator anymore? You just sit there and take votes and you’re kind of a feudal serf for folks with a lot of money.” — Dale Schultz, 32-year Republican state legislator in Wisconsin and former state Senate Majority Leader, in 2013 before retiring rather than face a primary challenger backed by Americans for Prosperity. Several months later 
Schultz said: “I firmly believe that we are beginning in this country to look like a Russian-style oligarchy where a couple of dozen billionaires have basically bought the government.”
• “I was directly told, ‘You want to be chairman of House Administration, you want to continue to be chairman.’ They would actually put in writing that you have to raise $150,000. They still do that — Democrats and Republicans. If you want to be on this committee, it can cost you $50,000 or $100,000 — you have to raise that money in most cases.” — Bob Ney, five-term Republican congressman from Ohio and former chairman of the House Administration Committee who pleaded guilty to corruption charges connected to the Jack Abramoff scandal, in 2013. (Thanks to ratpatrol in comments below.)
• “The alliance of money and the interests that it represents, the access that it affords to those who have it at the expense of those who don’t, the agenda that it changes or sets by virtue of its power is steadily silencing the voice of the vast majority of Americans … The truth requires that we call the corrosion of money in politics what it is – it is a form of corruption and it muzzles more Americans than it empowers, and it is an imbalance that the world has taught us can only sow the seeds of unrest.” – 
Secretary of State John Kerry, in 2013 farewell speech to the Senate.
• “American democracy has been hacked. … The United States Congress … is now incapable of passing laws without permission from the corporate lobbies and other special interests that control their campaign finances.” — Al Gore, former vice president, in his 2013 book The Future. (Thanks to 
• “I think it is because of the corrupt paradigm that has become Washington, D.C., whereby votes continually are bought rather than representatives voting the will of their constituents. … That’s the voice that’s been missing at the table in Washington, D.C. — the people’s voice has been missing.” — 
Michele Bachmann, four-term Republican congresswoman from Minnesota and founder of the House Tea Party Caucus, in 2011.
• “I will begin by stating the sadly obvious: Our electoral system is a mess. Powerful financial interests, free to throw money about with little transparency, have corrupted the basic principles underlying our representative democracy.” — Chris Dodd, five-term Democratic senator from Connecticut, in 2010 farewell speech to the Senate. (Thanks to RO, via email.)
• “The banks — hard to believe in a time when we’re facing a banking crisis that many of the banks created — are still the most powerful lobby on Capitol Hill. And they frankly own the place.” – Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., in 2009.
• “Across the spectrum, money changed votes. Money certainly drove policy at the White House during the Clinton administration, and I’m sure it has in every other administration too.” —  Joe Scarborough, four-term Republican congressman from Florida and now co-host of “Morning Joe,” in the 1990s. (Thanks to rrheard in comments below.)
• “We are the only people in the world required by law to take large amounts of money from strangers and then act as if it has no effect on our behavior.” — Barney Frank, 16-term Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, in the 1990s. (Thanks to RO, via email.)
“… money plays a much more important role in what is done in Washington than we believe. … [Y]ou’ve got to cozy up, as an incumbent, to all the special interest groups who can go out and raise money for you from their members, and that kind of a relationship has an influence on the way you’re gonna vote. … I think we have to become much more vigilant on seeing the impact of money … I think it’s wrong and we’ve got to change it.” — Mitt Romney, then the Republican candidate running against Ted Kennedy for Senate, in 1994. (Thanks to LA, via email.)
• “There is no question in the world that money has control.” — Barry Goldwater, 1964 GOP Presidential nominee, just before retiring from the Senate in 1986.
• ”When these political action committees give money, they expect something in return other than good government. … Poor people don’t make political contributions. You might get a different result if there were a poor-PAC up here.” — Bob Dole, former Republican Senate Majority Leader and 1996 GOP Presidential nominee, in 1983.
• “Money is the mother’s milk of politics.” — Jesse Unruh, Speaker of the California Assembly in the 1960s and California State Treasurer in the 1970s and 80s.
• “I had a nice talk with Jack Morgan [i.e., banker J.P. Morgan, Jr.] the other day and he seemed more worried about [Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Rexford] Tugwell’s speech than about anything else, especially when Tugwell said, ‘From now on property rights and financial rights will be subordinated to human rights.’ … The real truth of the matter is, as you and I know, that a financial element in the larger centers has owned the Government ever since the days of Andrew Jackson … The country is going through a repetition of Jackson’s fight with the Bank of the United Stated — only on a far bigger and broader basis.” — Franklin D. Roosevelt in a 1933 letter to Edward M. House. (Thanks to LH, via email.)
• “Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government, owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people. To destroy this invisible government, to dissolve the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of the statesmanship of the day.” — 1912 platform of the Progressive Party, founded by former president Theodore Roosevelt. (Thanks to LH, via email.)
• “There are two things that are important in politics. The first is money and I can’t remember what the second one is.” — Mark Hanna, William McKinley’s 1896 presidential campaign manager and later senator from Ohio, in 1895.
Again, please leave other good examples in the comments or email them to me at any time — I’ll keep updating this indefinitely. I’m looking specifically for working politicians (rather than pundits or activists) who describe a tight linkage between money and political outcomes (as opposed to something vaguer).

CONTACT THE AUTHOR:


Jon Schwarzjon.schwarz@​theintercept.com@tinyrevolution
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