Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Facebook Uses Mind Control To Keep You Addicted!

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New Facebook Bombshell! Founder Confesses To Use Of Mind Control
Published on Nov 14, 2017
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Facebook's Zuckerberg Calls For New World Order! Illuminati Wants Your Privacy! Facebook Exposed
A Call For An Uprising
Published on Feb 19, 2017
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7 Telltale Signs of Facebook Addiction
Published by Michael Poh, in Social Media
Facebook has become so much a part of our life now that it’s so prevalent across the world. With close to a billion users out there, one can easily throw a stone and hit a Facebook user. The amount of time users engage in Facebook activities, like updating statuses, posting photos, commenting and ‘liking’ posts has also been increasing with smartphones and 3G/Wi-fi networks becoming commonplace in recent years.
(Image Source: Voices from Russia)
Given the accessibility and ease of use of Facebook whenever and wherever you are, it’s no wonder more and more people are addicted to the popular social networking site. You may ask, what’s wrong if you use Facebook frequently as a means of entertainment, or as a means to relieve your stress? Well, there’s nothing wrong. However, when Facebook activities start interfering with your everyday life and become detrimental to your daily functioning at work or in school, you might have a problem.
Here are some telltale signs of Facebook addiction you should take note
Recommended Reading: The Psychology of Facebook
1. Over-sharing
At a time when many netizens are concern over the issue of privacy online, it’s strange to find that there are still a number of us who voluntarily share our deepest secrets about our intimate lives on Facebook. It has perhaps a lot to do with the gratification of being acknowledged or approved by our peers. As I’ve mentioned in an earlier article, The Psychology of Facebook, such social affirmations by our friends in our network is a key draw of social networking sites.
There’s no basis for me to say that sharing about ourselves is wrong, because each of us have our own social needs to fulfill. It’s what makes us humans. What I’m talking about here is the idea of over-sharing, of saying too much and then regretting what we said. When we’re addicted to something, we’ll do anything just to get a satisfying dose of engagement in the activity. So in the case of Facebook addiction, we may become unable to judge what’s appropriate to share, allowing our desire to be heard to override our privacy concerns.
2. Checking Your Facebook Whenever Possible
This means checking out for any updates to your newsfeed or responses to your posts every time you don’t know what to do. In other words, the default choice for your freetime activity is to be on Facebook. So what do you do? You leave your Facebook open in the background, switching between work or assignments to the page every few minutes. Even when you are outside enjoying a drink with a friend, you log in to the Facebook app on your smartphone every now and then during brief moments of non-interactions.
The end result is that you get distracted in whatever it is you’re doing and you may find it hard to be fully present at the moment. Perhaps you may take a significantly longer amount of time to complete simple tasks or maybe some of your friends may complain that you don’t pay enough attention to what they say. No surprises there, seeing how your attention is always diverted to some Facebook notifications.
3. Overly Concerned with Facebook Image
Have you ever spent more than fifteen minutes of your time thinking about what you ought to type for your status update? After you’ve decided on what you should update and posted it, do you eagerly anticipate how others will respond to it? This is what it means when I mention your ‘Facebook image’. To some extent, we are all concerned over how we project ourselves to the rest of the world, even when it comes to our online presence.
Some of us though, may have been spending too much time managing a friend’s impression of them. It gets out of hand when you’re always trying to think of something cool, humorous, entertaining, etc to post just to show how awesome a guy or gal you are. After which, you get restless while you wait for others to comment or ‘like’ what you’ve posted and so you just keep checking and re-checking your Facebook to see if there’re any new notifications.
4. Reporting On Facebook
Most of us have seen friends in our network who almost certainly never fail to appear on our newsfeed each time we log on to Facebook. It could be some status update, check-in, posting of their photos and such. Their posts tend to be on very mundane matters, much like how someone reports to another what he or she is doing at any given moment. They report to you their daily routines (e.g. taking a piss), broadcast check-ins to uninteresting places like the street they live in, upload self-portraits and such.
(Image Source: Telegraphe)
It appears to be an attempt to remind others that they exist. Either that or these people are just trying to make their offline life co-existing with their Facebook one. If you are one of these people, I think it’s good to ask yourself the reason behind such ‘reporting’. To me, it seems to be a sign of obsession, as if you need to post something, no matter how ordinary or unimaginative, in order to relieve your anxiety of not doing so.
5. Spending Hours Browsing Through Facebook Every day
Spending about an hour or so daily looking through your newsfeeds and checking out profiles of your friends is still okay, but if it starts going beyond that, it’s an indicator of a problem. Sure, there’s loads of content on Facebook like photos, games and other interesting apps, but if you start using increasingly more of your valuable waking hours surfing aimlessly on Facebook, it’s time to reexamine your lifestyle.
The issue gets worse when you actually sacrifice your sleep to use Facebook. It’s as if the amount of waking hours you have aren’t enough for you to satisfy your Facebook cravings. Lack of sleep will undoubtedly affect your performance in school or work the next day, which is when Facebook becomes an addiction problem.
6. Mad rush to add more friends
For some users, Facebook addiction may manifest itself as an intense desire to add more friends. There is a perceived ‘arms race’ between you and your other friends to see who has the highest number of friends on their network. The keyword here is ‘perceived’, because you may think there’s a competition but in fact there might be none (i.e. your friends could not care less about whether they have more or fewer friends than you). The contention on who has more friends may just be your personal quest to be seen as more ‘popular’.
(Image Source:  jimake)
Interestingly, a research done by psychologists from Edinburgh Napier University found that Facebook users with more friends on their network tend to be more stressed up when using Facebook. The more friends you have, the more you feel pressured to maintain appropriate etiquette for different types of friends while remaining entertaining. In other words, the competition in adding friends may result in a vicious cycle of increasing Facebook-related tensions, resulting in worse addiction outcomes.
7. Compromising offline social life
As you get used to communicating on Facebook via messaging, sharing photos and posts, commenting and ‘liking’ others etc, it may come to a point when you get more comfortable socializing online than offline. You become over-reliant on Facebook to fulfill your social needs and may start sacrificing the time spent on real-life meet-ups for coffee with your friends.
That’s not healthy. Let’s face it, face-to-face communication is a far richer experience than communicating online where one cannot actually see non-verbal communication as in the body language, gestures, voice tones, etc. It’s not surprising that text messages often get misinterpreted, resulting in misunderstandings. In the long run, your social life suffers because your communication is limited to Facebook and not with a real-life friend.
Overcoming Facebook Addiction
Looking back at the signs and symptoms of Facebook addiction, I realize I am by no means immune to it. Over-sharing? Check. Refreshing my Facebook newsfeed whenever I have the chance? Check. The only consolation I have for myself is that I don’t do that on a regular basis; I simply fall in to the trap every once in a while. That’s not considered an addiction… I hope(?). I’ve read a number of articles that offer tips on how one can overcome Facebook addiction, and most of these offer precise step-by-step solutions on how to address your issue.
(Image Source: Lowlandet)
Tips like first admitting you have a problem, setting aside a fixed time to check your Facebook, turning off notifications, etc are all legitimate. However, it might be more effective if we deal with the root of the addiction problem by finding out why you are depending on Facebook so much.
Is it because you’re using Facebook to avoid dealing with some things, such as your work or personal issues at home? Once you know what the underlying issue is, you’ll be more confident to manage your addiction. If there’s none to be found, then maybe it has to do with habit. Put Facebook away for awhile, go out and experience the offline world by interacting with your friends face-to-face. You’ll realize how much more wonderful that is than to stare at your newsfeed all day long. That’s when change can begin.
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How Addicted to Facebook Are You?

Answer 16 Questions
Go Here: http://theoatmeal.com/quiz/facebook_addict
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5 Psychological Reasons You Are Addicted to Facebook and 5 Ways to Break the Habit
Daniel Wallen
Hi. My name is Daniel and I am a recovering Facebook addict. Whew, it felt good to admit that out in the open. With that confession out of the way, I’d like to help you understand why you are addicted to Facebook. I’ll even provide some easy steps that you can take today to break the habit and be more productive.
The first step to breaking any bad habit is to understand the psychological triggers that made you pick up the habit in the first place. Below are five common ones that I know very well.
1. Facebook scrolling is a symptom of procrastination.
Facebook capitalizes on your tendency to procrastinate by incorporating a news feed with an infinite scroll. No matter how far down you go, there will always be more memes and status updates to keep you distracted from whatever you should be doing. Thus, it might be helpful to change your perception of Facebook. Instead of looking at it like a place to be social or kill time, frame Facebook as the enemy of your productivity and purpose. Doesn’t sound as tempting now, huh?
2. Facebook over-sharing is a symptom of loneliness or indecision.
Facebook resembles a boring reality TV show that is on full display during every hour of the day. Do you really need to tell everybody what you ate for lunch? I doubt it. You don’t share such trivial details to add value to people’s lives. You’re doing it, because you’re lonely and desperate for approval. Seeking opinions from your friends could be a sign of indecision or low self-confidence. If you get a bad suggestion, then you can conveniently blame somebody else, thus protecting your ego.
3. Facebook creeping is a symptom of misplaced affection or unhealthy self-comparisons.
Facebook makes it easy to be a creeper. There are two primary causes of creeping and neither of them are pretty. If you’re creeping the profile of your ex, then you’re probably living in the past. Seek professional help if you are struggling to let go. If you’re browsing the profile of a crush, then you’d be better off actively pursuing them. Send them a thoughtful message to get a conversation started. If that goes well, ask them out on a date. Creeping could also be a form of self-inflicted misery. It’s already hard to resist the human urge to compare ourselves to other people. Facebook makes this convenient to do.
4. Obsessive checking of Facebook notifications is a symptom of impatience or people-pleasing.
Facebook takes advantage of your desire for instant gratification. Your brain receives a dopamine hit every time you see that red notification light up. Dopamine is a chemical in your brain that causes you to seek pleasure from things like food, sex, and drugs. Pleasure sounds nice in theory, but dopamine is responsible for self-destructive behavior. Thus, becoming a slave to your notifications can destroy your self-control in a hurry. If that wasn’t bad enough, the human desire to be liked and accepted is at play, too. Every time you get a “Like”, your brain decides that means somebody likes you. Keep this up and you’ll turn into an addict desperate for another “hit.”
5. Obsessive refreshing of your Facebook feed is a symptom of a fear of missing out (a.k.a. FOMO).
Facebook wrecks your focus by preying on your fear of missing out. You check your feed during a date, because you don’t want to miss any interesting updates. You check your messages while you drive, because a friend might have something exciting to share. Never mind that you might turn off your date or wreck your car and die. The possibilities are endless, so it’s totally worth it. That was sarcasm if you didn’t notice. I’m being dramatic to demonstrate how reckless these behaviors are.
If you’re ready to break your addiction to Facebook, follow these five steps.
1. Admit you have an addiction.
You can’t fix a problem if you deny it exists. Don’t beat yourself up, but do try and be honest enough to admit you’re a Facebook addict. If it makes you feel any better, I’m a recovering addict myself. There is no reason to be ashamed. Telling a trusted friend might help you stay accountable, especially if they share your goal.
2. Be mindful of the triggers that provoke the habit.
Every psychological trigger I discussed here won’t necessarily be relevant to you. That’s okay. Focus on the ones that are. If you’re not sure, here’s a reflection exercise that might be helpful. It will reveal why you’re having such a hard time breaking the habit. Record the following details in a diary or journal until you identify some common trends:
  • What did I do? (scrolling, over-sharing, creeping, notification checking, or feed refreshing)
  • When did I do it? (down-time at work, as soon as you woke up, right before bed, on a date, etc.)
  • What happened right before? (if a stressful or upsetting event occurred, that could be significant)
  • How did this make me feel? (use a descriptive adjective to describe your mood before and after the incident)

3. Consciously acknowledge the habit for what it is.
This step will break Facebook’s hold on you as long as you can be consistent. Every time you feel the urge to update your status or check your feed, recognize that impulse for what it is (a habitual behavior — NOT a conscious decision). This is especially powerful when you complete step #2, because you’ll be able to make a mental note of the specific psychological trigger at play.
4. Practice self-compassion during the process, no matter how frustrated you might get.
Facebook is an epic time-suck, but that doesn’t mean you should criticize yourself every time you log-on to your feed. Psychologists consider procrastination a misplaced coping mechanism. Beating yourself up will make you feel bad about yourself, which will ironically cause you to be even more tempted. Self-loathing can only lead to failure. You might end up deciding it’s hopeless, because you are “too lazy.”  If you want to break your addiction for good, then you need to be self-compassionate.
5. Replace the habit with a positive alternative that you can track or measure in some way.
It’s a lot easier to eliminate a bad habit when you decide on a good habit that you would like to replace it with. I applied this idea by choosing to pick up a book every time I was tempted to check my feed. The result blew my mind. I read over a hundred pages in the first day! Trust me when I say those “few minutes of down-time” can add up to an obscene amount of waste. Having a specific metric to track is important. If you want to stay encouraged, you need to have compelling evidence that your time would be better spent elsewhere.
This is going to sound ridiculous given the subject of the article, but…
Would you please pass this along to your friends on Facebook? I don’t mean to demonize the website entirely. It’s a great place to stay in touch with the people we care about. Even so, it’s time to break our addictions so we can achieve our purpose and enjoy the company of the people right in front of us.
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Also See:
Beware These fake Facebook Messenger Posts Spreading Malware
From alphr.com
A virulent malware campaign has hit Facebook Messenger over the past few days, linking users to malicious websites and downloading software onto their machines.
Security companies including Kaspersky Lab and  Avira have issued warnings about Facebook Messenger posts that appear to link to videos, coming from users’ friends on the social network.
The format of the message is the user’s first name, followed by ‘video’ and a shorted bit.ly or t.cn link.
“The link points to a Google doc,” writes Kaspersky Lab security expert David Jacoby. “The document has already taken a picture from the victim’s Facebook page and created a dynamic landing page which looks like a playable movie.”
Trying to play the video will redirect the victim to different pages, depending on their geographical location, operating system and browser. Kaspersky reports that Firefox users on Windows and Mac are taken to a fake Flash Player installer that downloads adware, while Chrome users find themselves on a fake YouTube page that downloads a malicious Chrome extension. On OSX Safari, the researchers reported a similar account to Firefox, but with a fake Flash Media Player installer for Mac.
It may be that the adware collects credentials for Facebook accounts, and hence perpetrates the spam campaign, although Jacoby notes that research into the use of Facebook Messenger is ongoing.
Attacks of this kind are not unprecedented, although using Google Docs and customised landing pages for the fake videos is novel. Researchers haven’t found evidence that the malware downloads trojans or more serious exploits, but it does seem to grant some level of access to user’s Facebook accounts. We’ve reached out to Jacoby for clarification.

If you do receive a suspicious messenger on the platform, do not click the link, but do try to contact the person who sent the message to let them know they should change their account password. It’s also worth making sure your antivirus protection is up to date.fake Facebook Messenger Posts Spreading Malware
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Also See:

Facebook Wants Nude Pictures Of You!

08 November 2017
https://arcticcompass.blogspot.ca/2017/11/facebook-wants-nude-pictures-of-you.html
and

Really? You Will Spy On Yourself On Facebook For CIA?

29 September 2017
and

The Media is Non-Biased, Right?

(Part 3)
15 May 2016
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